You searched for:

One result

1 - 25 of 37 results

    • Item number: 2014-13.090
    • Date: 10 Aug 2018
    • Contributors: Emilia Sergio Salazar (consultant), Zachary O'Hagan (researcher, donor)
    • Language: Caquinte (cot)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Kitepámpani, Megantoni, La Convención, Cusco, Peru
    • Description: The speaker tells a story about the 'ashibanti' spirit, associated with shamans, and a woman.
    • Collection: Caquinte Field Materials
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Ashibanti irosati mankigarentsi ("The Ashibanti Spirit and the Woman"), 2014-13.090, in "Caquinte Field Materials", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/25607.
    • Item number: 2014-13.072
    • Date: 04 Aug 2018
    • Contributors: Emilia Sergio Salazar (consultant), Zachary O'Hagan (researcher, donor)
    • Language: Caquinte (cot)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Kitepámpani, Megantoni, La Convención, Cusco, Peru
    • Description: The speaker tells a story about Otter and Firefly.
    • Collection: Caquinte Field Materials
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Barari irisati piroti ("Otter and Firefly"), 2014-13.072, in "Caquinte Field Materials", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/25589.
    • Item number: 2014-13.010
    • Date: 06 Aug 2014
    • Contributors: Emilia Sergio Salazar (consultant), Zachary O'Hagan (researcher, donor)
    • Language: Caquinte (cot)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Kitepámpani, Megantoni, La Convención, Cusco, Peru
    • Description: The speaker tells a story about Deer and Jaguar, which she wrote and is reading aloud from. The plot centers around Deer's deception of Jaguar: Jaguar inquires as to how Deer's children are so clean. She tells him that it is because there is a special plant in the forest that she uses to bathe them. Jaguar asks whether Deer is willing to bathe his own children. She acquiesces, but her use of the plant instead causes the children to suffer from scabies, from which they later die.
    • Collection: Caquinte Field Materials
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Chonchokoronti aisati ajitsi ("Deer and Jaguar"), 2014-13.010, in "Caquinte Field Materials", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/23706.
    • Item number: 2014-13.020
    • Date: 30 Jul 2015
    • Contributors: Emilia Sergio Salazar (consultant), Zachary O'Hagan (researcher, donor)
    • Language: Caquinte (cot)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Kitepámpani, Megantoni, La Convención, Cusco, Peru
    • Description: The speaker tells a story about Collared Peccary, which she wrote and is reading aloud from. The plot centers around a man who is approached by a collared peccary (in his human form) who states that he wants to become his brother-in-law. Previously Collared Peccary has been tricking the man by transforming into different species of fish that the man tries to catch but that disappear. The man conspires with his daughter to provide Collared Peccary with ample amounts of manioc beer, so that he will transform when drunk and thus be observable. Once he gets drunk, the man grabs him and beats him, and in that state reverts to being a peccary, in which form he remains permanently.
    • Collection: Caquinte Field Materials
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Imoroiroki ("Collared Peccary"), 2014-13.020, in "Caquinte Field Materials", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/23715.
    • Item number: 2014-13.027
    • Date: 08 Jul 2016
    • Contributors: Emilia Sergio Salazar (consultant), Zachary O'Hagan (researcher, donor)
    • Language: Caquinte (cot)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Kitepámpani, Megantoni, La Convención, Cusco, Peru
    • Description: Questions about community and family in early life; recorded in the home of JSS
    • Collection: Caquinte Field Materials
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Interview, 2014-13.027, in "Caquinte Field Materials", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/23830.
    • Item number: 2014-13.021
    • Date: 03 Aug 2015
    • Contributors: Emilia Sergio Salazar (consultant), Zachary O'Hagan (researcher, donor)
    • Language: Caquinte (cot)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Kitepámpani, Megantoni, La Convención, Cusco, Peru
    • Description: The speaker tells a story about Tortoise and Fox, which she wrote and is reading aloud from. The plot centers around Tortoise, who challenges Fox to a competition during which they will not eat for three days. Fox dies from the competition, after which Deer arrives. Tortoise challenges Deer to a race (to a certain mountain), and the Deer confidently takes it up. Deer advances ahead of Tortoise but then becomes tired and rests; at this moment, Tortoise rolls into a ball and rolls the rest of the way, beating Deer to the mountain.
    • Collection: Caquinte Field Materials
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Kabori irisati sooro ("Tortoise and Fox"), 2014-13.021, in "Caquinte Field Materials", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/23716.
    • Item number: 2014-13.026
    • Date: 04 Jul 2016
    • Contributors: Emilia Sergio Salazar (consultant), Zachary O'Hagan (researcher, donor)
    • Language: Caquinte (cot)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Kitepámpani, Megantoni, La Convención, Cusco, Peru
    • Description: The speaker tells a story about Piranha, which she wrote and is reading aloud from. The plot centers around a rich man who offers to give his most beautiful daughter to the animal that can withstand jumping into boiling water. Piranha wins the competition, and goes on to be very successful, building a large house, etc. Later Piranha comes into the possession of a valuable ring, which the rich man steals from him. A set of animals assist Piranha in stealing the ring back from the rich man.
    • Collection: Caquinte Field Materials
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Kachapa ("Piranha"), 2014-13.026, in "Caquinte Field Materials", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/23829.
    • Item number: 2014-13.075
    • Date: 06 Aug 2018
    • Contributors: Emilia Sergio Salazar (consultant), Zachary O'Hagan (researcher, donor)
    • Language: Caquinte (cot)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Kitepámpani, Megantoni, La Convención, Cusco, Peru
    • Description: The speaker tells a story about Mushroom.
    • Collection: Caquinte Field Materials
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Kajebi ("Mushroom"), 2014-13.075, in "Caquinte Field Materials", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/25592.
    • Item number: 2014-13.019
    • Date: 27 Jul 2015
    • Contributors: Emilia Sergio Salazar (consultant), Zachary O'Hagan (researcher, donor)
    • Language: Caquinte (cot)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Kitepámpani, Megantoni, La Convención, Cusco, Peru
    • Description: The speaker tells a story about Snake, which she wrote and is reading aloud from. The plot centers around a woman who encounters Snake (in his human form) in the forest. She wants to marry Snake, but her father intervenes, killing him. Previously, however, the woman has become pregnant with Snake's children, and goes on to give birth to them, from which she dies and snakes begin to populate the Earth.
    • Collection: Caquinte Field Materials
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Kamaarini ("Snake"), 2014-13.019, in "Caquinte Field Materials", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/23714.
    • Item number: 2014-13.008
    • Date: 21 Jul 2014
    • Contributors: Emilia Sergio Salazar (consultant), Zachary O'Hagan (researcher, donor)
    • Language: Caquinte (cot)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Kitepámpani, Megantoni, La Convención, Cusco, Peru
    • Description: The speaker tells a story about Jaguar, which she wrote and is reading aloud from. The plot centers around Jaguar's roaming through the forest asking different animals whether or not they dislike him. Most animals say they do not, until Jaguar reaches a tapir, who confesses to disliking him. Jaguar in turn attacks him, but the tapir feigns death. Jaguar summons his compatriots to eat the tapir, but in the meantime the tapir escapes.
    • Collection: Caquinte Field Materials
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Kasekari ("Jaguar"), 2014-13.008, in "Caquinte Field Materials", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/23704.
    • Item number: 2014-13.101
    • Date: 15 Aug 2018
    • Contributors: Emilia Sergio Salazar (consultant), Zachary O'Hagan (researcher, donor)
    • Language: Caquinte (cot)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Kitepámpani, Megantoni, La Convención, Cusco, Peru
    • Description: The speaker tells a story about Jaguar.
    • Collection: Caquinte Field Materials
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Kasekari ("Jaguar"), 2014-13.101, in "Caquinte Field Materials", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/25618.
    • Item number: 2014-13.018
    • Date: 17 Jul 2015
    • Contributors: Emilia Sergio Salazar (consultant), Zachary O'Hagan (researcher, donor)
    • Language: Caquinte (cot)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Kitepámpani, Megantoni, La Convención, Cusco, Peru
    • Description: The speaker tells a story about the River Monster, which she wrote and is reading aloud from. The plot centers around a set of animals who encounter the River Monster as they bathe, and their various efforts to free each other from his grasp.
    • Collection: Caquinte Field Materials
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Kebetsi ("River Monster"), 2014-13.018, in "Caquinte Field Materials", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/23713.
    • Item number: 2014-13.036
    • Date: 05 Sep 2016
    • Contributors: Emilia Sergio Salazar (consultant), Zachary O'Hagan (researcher, donor)
    • Language: Caquinte (cot)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Kitepámpani, Megantoni, La Convención, Cusco, Peru
    • Description: The speaker tells a story about Vampire Bat, which she wrote and is reading aloud from. The plot enters around two Caquintes who have a set of beautiful daughters who they serially marry off to Vampire Bat (in his human form), despite the fact that secretly murders each one. He blames each murder on a mysterious, swampy lake named Tsonkamonki, which his wives should have heeded is advice to avoid, and which, he says, consumes them. Later his brother-in-law accompanies one of his wives to live with him and together they discover the truth, returning Vampire Bat to their father, who kills him. However, when the brother-in-law attempts to put Vampire Bat's dead body in a clay pot, he transforms into a bat and flies away.
    • Collection: Caquinte Field Materials
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Pinchinchi irisati kakinte ("Vampire Bat and the Man"), 2014-13.036, in "Caquinte Field Materials", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/23839.
    • Item number: 2014-13.099
    • Date: 13 Aug 2018
    • Contributors: Emilia Sergio Salazar (consultant), Zachary O'Hagan (researcher, donor)
    • Language: Caquinte (cot)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Kitepámpani, Megantoni, La Convención, Cusco, Peru
    • Description: The speaker tells a story about the bird 'pishontyorintyori.'
    • Collection: Caquinte Field Materials
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Pishontyorintyori ("Pishontyorintyori Bird"), 2014-13.099, in "Caquinte Field Materials", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/25616.
    • Item number: 2014-13.007
    • Date: 14 Jul 2014
    • Contributors: Emilia Sergio Salazar (consultant), Zachary O'Hagan (researcher, donor)
    • Language: Caquinte (cot)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Kitepámpani, Megantoni, La Convención, Cusco, Peru
    • Description: The speaker tells a story about Squirrel, which she wrote and is reading aloud from. The plot centers around Squirrel's trickster activities: he convinces Jaguar to crush his testicle by telling him that it will do know harm, as evidenced by the fact that Squirrel has been crushing his own testicle. In reality Squirrel has been crushing "keta" fruit, but Jaguar does not know the difference.
    • Collection: Caquinte Field Materials
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Pisonono ("Squirrel"), 2014-13.007, in "Caquinte Field Materials", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/23703.
    • Item number: 2014-13.029
    • Date: 06 Aug 2016
    • Contributors: Emilia Sergio Salazar (consultant), Zachary O'Hagan (researcher, donor)
    • Language: Caquinte (cot)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Kitepámpani, Megantoni, La Convención, Cusco, Peru
    • Description: The speaker tells a story about Old Axe and Rat, which she wrote and is reading aloud from. The plot centers around a comical man named Old Axe and his sidekick Rat. Old Axe marries the beautiful daughter of Eagle and Cloud, named Flower, who is then taken from him. The two companions go on a long search for Old Axe's wife, but when they find her, Cloud, angry at the situation, transforms her immediate family into their non-human forms, leaving Old Axe to live out the rest of his life with the children he had with Flower.
    • Collection: Caquinte Field Materials
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Poshontyo tsorintsoripiori aisati kababaantoni ("Old Axe and Rat"), 2014-13.029, in "Caquinte Field Materials", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/23832.
  1. Digital assets in this Item (not available for download):
    video_cot_2016.06.27_repsol_reunion_1.MP4 (1486159 bytes)
    video_cot_2016.06.27_repsol_reunion_2.MP4 (2125578214 bytes)
    video_cot_2016.06.27_repsol_reunion_3.MP4 (530118303 bytes)
    video_cot_2016.06.27_repsol_reunion_4.MPG (863232463 bytes)
    video_cot_2016.06.27_repsol_reunion_5.MP4 (15025582 bytes)
    video_cot_2016.06.27_repsol_reunion_6.MPG (157137567 bytes)
    video_cot_2016.06.27_repsol_reunion_7.MP4 (2061189896 bytes)
    video_cot_2016.07.14_repsol_reunion_1.MP4 (1358910034 bytes)
    video_cot_2016.07.14_repsol_reunion_2.MP4 (956202328 bytes)
    video_cot_2016.07.15_repsol_reunion_1.MP4 (346905047 bytes)
    video_cot_2016.07.15_repsol_reunion_2.MP4 (1957420393 bytes)
    video_cot_2016.07.15_repsol_reunion_3.MP4 (1426077912 bytes)
    video_cot_2016.07.15_repsol_reunion_4.MP4 (2125312735 bytes)
    video_cot_2016.07.15_repsol_reunion_5.MP4 (173875377 bytes)
    video_cot_2016.08.12_repsol_reunion_1.MP4 (1514279861 bytes)
    video_cot_2016.08.12_repsol_reunion_2.MPG (949717945 bytes)
    video_cot_2016.08.12_repsol_reunion_3.MPG (700046519 bytes)
    video_cot_2016.08.12_repsol_reunion_4.MP4 (2125717950 bytes)
    video_cot_2016.08.12_repsol_reunion_5.MP4 (45462429 bytes)
    video_cot_2016.09.03_repsol_reunion_1.MP4 (2125706474 bytes)
    video_cot_2016.09.03_repsol_reunion_2.MP4 (1042185062 bytes)

    • Item number: 2014-13.012
    • Date: 08 Aug 2014
    • Contributors: Emilia Sergio Salazar (consultant), Zachary O'Hagan (researcher, donor)
    • Language: Caquinte (cot)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Kitepámpani, Megantoni, La Convención, Cusco, Peru
    • Description: Narration of the Frog Story; bundle includes narration of story and review of narration with ZJO
    • Collection: Caquinte Field Materials
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Teento ("The Toad"), 2014-13.012, in "Caquinte Field Materials", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/23708.