You searched for:

One result

    • Collection number: 2015-06
    • Primary contributor: Amalia Horan Skilton (researcher, donor)
    • Additional contributors: Ling Candido Serra (consultant), Marcelo Farías Caetano (consultant), Jaksal Guerrero Coello (consultant), Deoclesio Guerrero Gómez (consultant), Amalia Guerrero Sanpayo (consultant), Jhon Jairo Huancho Guerrero (consultant), Katia Lucero Salate Candido (consultant)
    • Language: Ticuna (tca)
    • Dates: 2015-
    • Historical information: Ticuna is a language isolate spoken by approximately 60,000 people living in on and near the main course of the Amazon River in northern Peru, southern Colombia, and western Brazil.
      The data archived here, part of a collection under continuous development, were collected by UC Berkeley graduate student Amalia Skilton during field trips to the towns of Caballococha and Cushillococha, located in the district and province of Mariscal Ramón Castilla, Loreto, Peru. Caballococha is a multi-ethnic town of about 10,000 people in which the dominant language is Spanish. Cushillococha, located 8km overland from Caballococha, is a monoethnic Ticuna community of about 4,000 people in which the dominant language is Ticuna.
      All file bundles consisting of recordings contain a text README file with detailed metadata.
    • Scope and content: Primary materials (e.g., audio recordings), derived products (e.g., transcriptions and translations), and analyses of Ticuna. This collection includes *only* materials derived from elicitation and Boasian-style texts. See collection 2018-19 for materials derived from recordings of conversations and other naturally occurring discourses. See collection 2018-20 for experimental materials.
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Ticuna elicitation and texts, SCL 2015-06, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.7297/X29P2ZPJ

One result

We acknowledge with respect the Ohlone people on whose traditional, ancestral, and unceded land we work and whose historical relationships with that land continue to this day.