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    • Collection number: 2014-10
    • Primary contributors: Nicholas Rolle (researcher), Alfonso Otaegui (researcher), Lev Michael (researcher), Zachary O'Hagan (researcher), Kamala Russell (researcher), Eva Schinzel (researcher), Hector Zapana Almanza (consultant), Hannah Sande (researcher), Amalia Horan Skilton (researcher), Kenneth Baclawski (researcher), Herman H. Leung (researcher), Spencer Lamoureux (researcher)
    • Language: Aymara
    • Dates: September 2014 to May 2015
    • Historical information: These materials were produced by students of the field methods course in the Department of Linguistics at UC Berkeley between September 2014 and May 2015. The course was taught by Professor Lev Michael and the language consultant was Hector Zapana Almanza, a native speaker of the variety of Aymara spoken around Lake Titicaca in Peru. All other listed contributors were students in the course.
    • Scope and content: This collection consists of audio recordings and scanned copies of field notes that derive from elicitation sessions conducted during biweekly class meetings held throughout the course of the academic year. Some texts are included.
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Berkeley Field Methods: Aymara, SCL 2014-10, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.7297/X2S180HS
    • Collection number: 2014-01
    • Primary contributors: Lev Michael (researcher, author, donor), Vivian Wauters (researcher, donor, author), Lino Huanío Cabudivo (consultant), Zachary O'Hagan (researcher, predepositor, donor, author), Amelia Huanaquiri Tuisima (consultant), Arnaldo Huanaquiri Tuisima (consultant), Lazarina Cabudivo Tuisima (consultant), Clare S. Sandy (researcher, donor, author), Manuel Cabudivo Tuisima (consultant), Tammy Stark (researcher, donor, author), Alicia Huanío Cabudivo (consultant)
    • Additional contributors: Demie Cheng (researcher), Rosa Vallejos Yopán (donor, author, researcher), Zachary O'Hagan (transcriber), Christine Beier (donor, researcher), Brianna Grohman (researcher), Arnaldo Huanaquiri Tuisima (author), Teresa McFarland (researcher), Marc Januta (researcher)
    • Language: Omagua (omg)
    • Dates: 2003-
    • Historical information: Omagua is a Tupí-Guaraní language that was originally spoken along the main course of the Amazon River between the mouths of the Napo (modern-day Peru) and Juruá rivers (modern-day Brazil), as well as in the headwaters of the Napo, in and around the Aguarico and Tiputini basins. In the pre-Columbian period Omaguas were one of the most numerous ethnolinguistic groups of lowland South America. First contacted in 1542, they subsequently suffered from several epidemics throughout the remaining 16th and 17th centuries. Although a handful of Catholic missionaries proselytized among them in this early period, it was not until 1685 that intensive Jesuit efforts undertaken by Father Samuel Fritz began to have long-lasting effects on Omagua lifeways, especially settlement patterns. By the 1690s, Omaguas, already relocated to large islands in the middle of the Amazon due to demographic pressures from unrelated, neighboring upland peoples, began to flee the onslaughts of Portuguese slave raiders, which came to a head around 1710. By the early 1720s, they had resettled with the assistance of Jesuit priests on the left bank of the Amazon upriver of modern-day Iquitos, far outside their traditional territory. Their principal community, San Joaquín de Omaguas (SJQ), originally founded in a different downriver location by Samuel Fritz, became the seat of the lower Jesuit missions in the ecclesiastical jurisdiction of Maynas, administered from Quito. Here at least three unrelated ethnolinguistic groups came to coreside with Omaguas (i.e., Yameos, Yurimaguas, and Matses (then known as Mayorunas). Related Kokamas were also present. This mission site declined dramatically in importance on the regional stage following the expulsion of the Jesuits by Carlos III in 1767, and in the 1880s, at the onset of the Rubber Boom, it changed locations yet again. By the early 20th century Omagua speakers were severely reduced in numbers, due to some 50 years of sustained contact with lowland Quechua and Spanish speakers, and the disastrous effects of the Rubber Boom. The last generation of Omagua-dominant individuals was born in the 1910s, although this generation later became fully bilingual in Spanish.
      The materials that constitute the present collection derive from a research project begun by Lev Michael (LDM), Christine Beier, and Catherine Clark, then of the University of Texas at Austin, in 2003 to assess the sociolinguistic situation in SJQ and evaluate the possibility of carrying out future language documentation work in the area. Subsequent field trips in 2004 (Michael, with Edinson Huamancayo Curi, then of the Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos in Lima) and in 2006 (Brianna Grohman (BGG), then of UT Austin) built a base of recordings of oral narratives and a practical orthography that was subsequently used by speaker Arnaldo Huanaquiri Tuisima to produce a large, written text corpus of the language, with interlinearized Spanish translation. This corpus (item 2014-01.002) formed the basis of a team-based project at the University of California, Berkeley, headed by Lev Michael, which began in January 2009 and focused on the digitization, segmentation, and grammatical analysis of these texts. The first team members were Demie Cheng, Marc Januta (undergraduates), Teresa McFarland (graduate), Lev Michael (faculty), Zachary O'Hagan (ZJO), Tammy Stark (TES), and Vivian Wauters (VMW) (undergraduates). In Fall 2009, Cheng, Januta, and McFarland stepped aside and Clare Sandy (CSS, graduate) joined the project. At other points during the 2009-2010 academic year, Michael Roberts and Natalie Lloyd also participated in the project, mainly carrying out a first round of transcriptions of the audio recordings produced by Huamancayo in April 2004.
      In September 2009, Lev Michael and Rosa Vallejos, then of the University of Oregon, successfully applied for an NSF DEL grant (award #0966499 "Collaborative Research: Kokama-Kokamilla (cod) and Omagua (omg): Documentation, Description and (Non-)Genetic Relations"), which, in part, funded 8 weeks of in-situ fieldwork in SJQ for O'Hagan, Sandy, Stark, and Wauters between June and August 2010. (O'Hagan was also funded by UC Berkeley's Haas Scholars Program at this time.) O'Hagan and Sandy returned to SJQ and the nearby urban center of Iquitos for 8 more weeks of fieldwork between June and August 2011. During the 2010-2011 and 2011-2012 academic years, Michael, O'Hagan, Sandy, Stark, and Wauters met for a weekly seminar dedicated to the collaborative description of Omagua based on the materials that had been collected to that point. In July 2013, O'Hagan returned for additional brief fieldwork.
      Beginning in Spring 2010, Michael and O'Hagan began collaborating on a detailed analysis of four Jesuit-era ecclesiastical texts written in Omagua (two catechisms, the Lord's Prayer, and the Act of Faith), which formed the basis for the 2016 book that constitutes item 2014-01.017. Beginning in Spring 2011, while Michael was away on sabbatical, O'Hagan and Wauters (the latter by then a graduate student at UC Berkeley) began collaborating on the phonological and morphological reconstruction of Proto-Omagua-Kokama. This work later came to include Michael and Vallejos, and is ongoing (see item 2014-01.018).
      Omagua speakers Arnaldo Huanaquiri Tuisima (b. 1933, AHT) and his first cousin, Manuel Cabudivo Tuisima (1925-2010, MCT) were the first to collaborate with Michael, Beier, and Clark in 2003, and were the first to record oral narratives in the language (2014-01.001). At the time that longer-term, in-situ fieldwork was first carried out in 2010, they were thought to be the only remaining two speakers of the language. Unfortunately, Cabudivo Tuisima passed away in February of that year, before he could participate further in documentation of the language. Toward the end of the Summer 2010 field season, however, four additional speakers of the language were located: Alicia (b. 1932, AHC) and Lino (b. 1936, LHC) Huanío Cabudivo, the niece and nephew of Manuel Cabudivo T.; Amelia Huanaquiri Tuisima (b. 1930, AmHT), sister of Arnaldo Huanaquiri T.; and Lazarina Cabudivo Tuisima (1919-2014, LCT), sister of Manuel Cabudivo T. (In fact, an additional speaker, Paula Tuisima Huaní (c1919-2013), the maternal aunt of Lazarina and Manuel Cabudivo T., came to be known in 2011, but her health prevented her participation in the project.) The linguistic data gathered from these speakers radically changed the team's understanding of Omagua grammar, which had previously been based solely on the text corpus produced by Arnaldo Huanaquiri T. This results in the earliest preliminary descriptions of phonological and grammatical phenomena in the language, some of which are archived as part of this collection, being unreliable for the purposes of linguistic description. With that in mind, preference should be given to materials with a date of 2011 or later.
      File names are largely self-explanatory, typically consisting of some combination of date, initials of participants (see above), the language's ISO code (OMG), and other pertinent descriptive information. Materials deposited as of June 2016 will be augmented as future materials are processed.
    • Scope and content: Audio recordings of elicitation sessions and narrative texts; field notes; written narrative texts; derivative products (e.g., theses, dictionary drafts, conference handouts, etc.); preliminary grammatical descriptions; FLEx back-ups; historical and genealogical materials; grant proposals and budgets; personal correspondence; research products on colonial-era Old Omagua (OOMG) and Proto-Omagua-Kokama (POK)
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Materials of the Omagua Documentation Project, SCL 2014-01, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.7297/X28C9TDJ
    • Collection number: 2016-11
    • Primary contributors: Zachary O'Hagan (donor, researcher), Juan Cahuaza Mucushúa (consultant)
    • Language: Murato
    • Dates: 2011
    • Historical information: Murato, also known as Candoshi/Kandozi or Shapra, is a language isolate with a few thousand speakers resident in the greater Morona and Pastaza river basins in the Loreto Region of northeast Peru. The materials that constitute this small collection were produced during an unrelated exploratory field trip, the goal of which was to locate possible rememberers of the now extinct Yameo language (Peba-Yaguan). The consultant, born in Andoas on the upper Pastaza near the Ecuadorian border, was visiting in the community at the time. All audio was recorded on an H4N Zoom digital recorder with an Audio-Technica 803B lavalier microphone.
    • Scope and content: Audio recordings of elicitation sessions targeting lexicon, grammar, and history; field notes
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Murato Field Materials, SCL 2016-11, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.7297/X2W66HX8
    • Collection number: 2014-14
    • Primary contributors: Rafael Inuma Macusi (consultant), Zachary O'Hagan (donor, researcher), Simón Inuma Manizari (consultant), Jorge Macusi Nuribe (consultant), José Manuel Macusi Nuribe (consultant), Teolinda Inuma Vela (consultant), Juan Macusi Nuribe (consultant), Francisco Murayari Macusi (consultant)
    • Additional contributors: Manuel Berjón Martínez (interviewer, participant), Catalino Valencia Paima (consultant), Sonia Caritimari Huansi (participant), Gilter Yuyarima Tapullima (participant), Miguel Ángel Cadenas Cardo (interviewer, participant)
    • Languages: Urarina (ura), Omurano (omu)
    • Dates: 2011-2013
    • Historical information: Omurano is a language isolate formerly spoken in the headwaters of the Urituyacu River, a left-bank tributary of the Marañón River in the Loreto Region of northeast Peru. The materials that constitute this collection were produced by Zachary O'Hagan and rememberers of Omurano during two field trips, one an exploratory trip in 2011 to Nueva Alianza, the community at the mouth of the Urituyacu River, the other a lengthier trip in 2013 to several communities on the Urituyacu proper (Cafetal, Juan Velasco, Progreso I, Caimituyo, Triunfo, Lupunayo, San Antonio de Banal, San Luis, Guineal, and 8 de Octubre). The goal was to locate as many individuals as possible with some knowledge -- lexical, grammatical, historical -- of the Omurano language and/or people. The 2013 field trip was conducted in the company of Fathers Miguel Ángel Cadenas and Manuel Berjón, then priests at the parish of Santa Rita de Casia in Santa Rita de Castilla (Marañón River), and Sisters Nancy Roca and Eli Quiroz. Omurano data is restricted to a few dozen lexical items and basic phrases, and is significantly interspersed with Urarina language data, a neighboring isolate that is now the dominant language of daily life in the Urituyacu basin, and at times it is difficult to decipher what is Omurano and what is Urarina. All audio was recorded on an H4N Zoom digital recorder with an Audio-Technica 803B lavalier microphone. Funding for this research came from an Oswalt Endangered Language Grant administered by the Survey of California and Other Indian Languages in the Department of Linguistics at the University of California, Berkeley.
    • Scope and content: Audio recordings, scanned field notes, and photographs that derive from interviews and elicitation sessions concerning the Omurano language the regional history of the Urituyacu river basin
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Omurano Field Materials, SCL 2014-14, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.7297/X29K488M
    • Associated materials: 
    • Collection number: 2016-05
    • Primary contributors: Oscar Inuma Macusi (singer), Zachary O'Hagan (donor, researcher), Elsa Vela Clemente (singer), Jorge Macusi Nuribe (singer), Juana Macusi Manizari (singer), Ignacio Vela Nuribe (singer)
    • Languages: Urarina (ura), Omurano (omu)
    • Dates: 2013
    • Historical information: Urarina and Omurano are language isolates of the Loreto Region of northeast Peru. As of 2016, Urarina speakers number a few thousand, and the language is the dominant language of daily life in every community in which it is spoken. In contrast, only a handful of lexical items and songs are remembered of Omurano. Urarinas historically were concentrated on the Chambira River, a left-bank tributary of the Marañón; Omuranos inhabited the Urituyacu River, another left-bank tributary to the west. Since at least the late 19th century, Urarinas have begun to settle in significant numbers on the Urituyacu.
      The songs that comprise this collection were collected in June 2013 during a trip aimed at searching for speakers of Omurano. Zachary O'Hagan traveled in the company of Fathers Miguel Ángel Cadenas and Manuel Berjón, then priests of the parish of Santa Rita de Casia in Santa Rita de Castilla (Marañón River), and Sisters Nancy Roca and Eli Quiroz, resident in the same parish.
      Songs recorded on June 14 and 16 were recorded in the homes of the singers listed; songs recorded on June 17 were recorded in the context of a community-wide workshop. All songs were recorded on an H4N Zoom digital recorder with an Audio-Technica 803B lavalier microphone. Funding for this research came from an Oswalt Endangered Language Grant administered by the Survey of California and Other Indian Languages in the Department of Linguistics at the University of California, Berkeley.
    • Scope and content: Twelve songs, some with multiple versions, in Urarina and Omurano, from five singers
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Songs from the Urituyacu River, SCL 2016-05, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.7297/X2GH9FZD
    • Collection number: 2016-09
    • Primary contributors: Zachary O'Hagan (researcher, donor), Amadeo García García (consultant)
    • Additional contributors: Juanita Pérez Ríos (author), Nectalí Alicea Ortiz (author)
    • Language: Taushiro (trr)
    • Dates: 2015-
    • Historical information: Taushiro is a language isolate formerly spoken on the Huanganayacu and Aguaruna rivers, right-bank tributaries of the middle Tigre River in the Loreto Region of northeast Peru. The materials that constitute this collection were produced by Zachary O'Hagan and Amadeo García García, the last known fluent speaker of Taushiro, during a week of intensive exploratory fieldwork. In the early twentieth century, Taushiros probably numbered in the few hundreds, i.e., a small number of patrilineally defined (and named) kin groups. By the middle of the century, however, these extended family groups had been reduced to two, and by 1976, according to Nectalí Alicea Ortiz of the Summer Institute of Linguistics, there were 18 Taushiros across both groups. The preceding decades had seen unprecedented levels of death due to disease, as well as emigration due to forced labor, kidnapping, and out-marriage. The goal of the current, ongoing research project, is to expand on the initial work of Alicea Ortiz begun in the 1970s, with a focus on lexicon, grammar, and history. The recordings made constitute the only known recordings of the language still in existence (others were made on tape in the 1970s). Besides the sketches published by Alicea Ortiz and an undergraduate thesis on motion verbs in the language (included in this collection), there is no other documentation of Taushiro from any historical period. All audio was recorded in the home of José Álvarez Alonso on an H4N Zoom digital recorder with an Audio-Technica 803B lavalier microphone. Funding for this research came from O'Hagan's discretionary research funds administered by the Department of Linguistics at the University of California, Berkeley.
    • Scope and content: Audio recordings of elicitation sessions targeting lexicon, grammar, and history; texts; field notes; previously published materials
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Taushiro Field Materials, SCL 2016-09, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.7297/X20V89ZG

1 - 25 of 122 results

    • Item number: 2014-14.011
    • Date: 2011 to 2013
    • Contributor: Zachary O'Hagan (researcher, donor)
    • Language: Omurano (omu)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Collection: Omurano Field Materials
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Ancillary documents, 2014-14.011, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/23697
    • Item number: 2014-13.028
    • Date: 05 Aug 2016
    • Contributors: Zachary O'Hagan (researcher, donor), Antonina Salazar Torres (speaker), Joy Salazar Torres (speaker)
    • Language: Caquinte (cot)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Kitepámpani, Megantoni, La Convención, Cusco, Peru
    • Description: Two videos, with separate accompanying audio files, illustrating the views of two Caquinte women regarding the local activities of Repsol
    • Collection: Caquinte Field Materials
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Audio and video recordings of Repsol demands, 2014-13.028, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/23831
    • Item number: 2014-13.056
    • Date: 19 Aug 2017
    • Contributors: Miguel Sergio Salazar (consultant), Zachary O'Hagan (donor, researcher)
    • Languages: Caquinte (cot), Spanish (spa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Kitepámpani, Megantoni, La Convención, Cusco, Peru
    • Description: Inalienable (classificatory) nouns; lexicon; focus; demonstratives and markers -tika, =ga, =Npani; interrogatives with second-position clitics; meaning of clitics =sa, =sakanika, =te; contrastive topic =ga.
    • Collection: Caquinte Field Materials
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Audio recording of elicitation, 2014-13.056, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/24519
    • Item number: 2014-13.043
    • Date: 11 Jul 2017 to 18 Aug 2017
    • Contributors: Zachary O'Hagan (researcher, donor), Antonina Salazar Torres (consultant)
    • Language: Caquinte (cot)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Kitepámpani, Megantoni, La Convención, Cusco, Peru
    • Description: July 11: meaning and ordering of second-position clitics =kea, =mpa, =sa, =sakanika, =tari, =te; distribution and ordering of contrastive topic =ga and ostensive -tika; interaction of some of these markers with demonstratives. July 15: verbal affix ordering. July 18: verbal affix ordering; lexical elicitation. July 21: ordering of second-position clitics =geti, =ka, =me, =sano, =shia, =ta, =tari; meaning of =gitatsi, =ha, =ka, =kea, =satine. July 31: verbal affix ordering; meaning of -amaNpeg, -na, =kea; distribution of focus pronouns; questions regarding traditional house construction, beliefs about death and the afterlife. August 3: different series of pronouns; lexical elicitation; beliefs regarding the places Kamameniari, Kobirichaigirini, Tsonkatagaroni, Kompiroshiato. August 5: lexical elicitation. August 10: contrastive topic =ga; lexical elicitation. August 14: lexical elicitation based on Jaame Ontsajigero Otsapapae (the draft of a book of stories produced by the Ministry of Education). August 18: meaning of verbal suffixes -ima, -giha; affix ordering; lexical elicitation; questions regarding fire fans.
    • Collection: Caquinte Field Materials
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Audio recording of elicitation sessions, 2014-13.043, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/24506
    • Item number: 2014-13.002
    • Date: 29 Aug 2011 to 30 Aug 2011
    • Relations to this bundle: 2014-13.001 references this Item
    • Contributors: Miguel Sergio Salazar (consultant), Zachary O'Hagan (researcher, donor)
    • Language: Caquinte (cot)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Cusco, Cusco, Cusco, Cusco, Peru
    • Description: Recordings made in the researcher's temporary lodgings while the consultant was a student at the Universidad Nacional de San Antonio Abad del Cusco
    • Collection: Caquinte Field Materials
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Audio recordings of elicitation on lexicon, reality status, and kinship, 2014-13.002, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/22600
    • Item number: 2014-13.025
    • Date: 28 Jun 2016 to 05 Sep 2016
    • Contributors: Zachary O'Hagan (researcher, donor), Antonina Salazar Torres (consultant)
    • Language: Caquinte (cot)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Kitepámpani, Megantoni, La Convención, Cusco, Peru
    • Description: Questions range over speaker's extended family and Caquinte population as a whole; recorded at the home of JSS
    • Collection: Caquinte Field Materials
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Audio recordings of genealogical and historical interviews, 2014-13.025, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/23735
    • Item number: 2014-13.044
    • Date: 12 Jul 2017
    • Relations to this bundle: 2014-13.057 is a version of this Item
    • Contributors: Zachary O'Hagan (researcher, donor), Joy Salazar Torres (consultant)
    • Language: Caquinte (cot)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Kitepámpani, Megantoni, La Convención, Cusco, Peru
    • Description: The speaker tells a story about Bear.
    • Collection: Caquinte Field Materials
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Baabaikonta irosati mankigarentsi ("Bear and the Woman"), 2014-13.044, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/24507
    • Item number: 2014-13.055
    • Date: 19 Aug 2017
    • Contributors: Zachary O'Hagan (donor, researcher), Joy Salazar Torres (consultant)
    • Language: Caquinte (cot)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Kitepámpani, Megantoni, La Convención, Cusco, Peru
    • Description: The speaker tells a story about Otter and Firefly.
    • Collection: Caquinte Field Materials
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Barari irisati piroti ("Otter and Firefly"), 2014-13.055, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/24518
    • Item number: 2014-13.046
    • Date: 19 Jul 2017
    • Relations to this bundle: 2014-13.057 is a version of this Item
    • Contributors: Zachary O'Hagan (researcher, donor), Joy Salazar Torres (consultant)
    • Language: Caquinte (cot)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Kitepámpani, Megantoni, La Convención, Cusco, Peru
    • Description: The speaker tells a story about Otter.
    • Collection: Caquinte Field Materials
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Barari irosati mankigarentsi ("Otter and the Woman"), 2014-13.046, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/24509
    • Item number: 2014-13.010
    • Date: 06 Aug 2014
    • Relations to this bundle: 2014-13.022 references this Item; 2014-13.057 is a version of this Item
    • Contributors: Zachary O'Hagan (researcher, donor), Emilia Sergio Salazar (consultant)
    • Language: Caquinte (cot)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Kitepámpani, Megantoni, La Convención, Cusco, Peru
    • Description: The speaker tells a story about Deer and Jaguar, which she wrote and is reading aloud from. The plot centers around Deer's deception of Jaguar: Jaguar inquires as to how Deer's children are so clean. She tells him that it is because there is a special plant in the forest that she uses to bathe them. Jaguar asks whether Deer is willing to bathe his own children. She acquiesces, but her use of the plant instead causes the children to suffer from scabies, from which they later die.
    • Collection: Caquinte Field Materials
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Chonchokoronti aisati ajitsi ("Deer and Jaguar"), 2014-13.010, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/23706
    • Item number: 2014-10.018
    • Date: 23 Sep 2014
    • Contributors: Nicholas Rolle (researcher), Alfonso Otaegui (researcher), Zachary O'Hagan (researcher), Eva Schinzel (researcher), Hector Zapana Almanza (consultant)
    • Language: Aymara
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Berkeley, CA
    • Description: Question words; motion; verb inflection (ES); /tʃ/ vs. /tʃʰ/, /k'/ vs. /q'/ (NR); kinship terms (ZO)
    • Collection: Berkeley Field Methods: Aymara
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Class elicitation session, 2014-10.018, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.7297/X24X55TT
    • Item number: 2014-10.122
    • Date: 31 Mar 2015
    • Contributors: Nicholas Rolle (researcher), Zachary O'Hagan (researcher), Hector Zapana Almanza (consultant), Amalia Horan Skilton (researcher)
    • Language: Aymara
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Berkeley, CA
    • Description: Domain of vowel lowering; evidentiality; questions; -sa/-sti
    • Collection: Berkeley Field Methods: Aymara
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Class elicitation session, 2014-10.122, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.7297/X2MG7MHS
    • Item number: 2014-10.071
    • Date: 17 Feb 2015
    • Contributors: Zachary O'Hagan (researcher), Kamala Russell (researcher), Hector Zapana Almanza (consultant)
    • Language: Aymara
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Berkeley, CA
    • Description: Evidentials (ZO); directionals (KR)
    • Collection: Berkeley Field Methods: Aymara
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Class elicitation session, 2014-10.071, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.7297/X2Z31WPC
    • Item number: 2014-10.098
    • Date: 10 Mar 2015
    • Contributors: Zachary O'Hagan (researcher), Kamala Russell (researcher), Hector Zapana Almanza (consultant), Hannah Sande (researcher)
    • Language: Aymara
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Berkeley, CA
    • Description: Reportatives (ZO); directionals (KR); reflexives (HS)
    • Collection: Berkeley Field Methods: Aymara
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Class elicitation session, 2014-10.098, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.7297/X2FX77GQ
    • Item number: 2014-10.032
    • Date: 28 Oct 2014
    • Contributors: Nicholas Rolle (researcher), Zachary O'Hagan (researcher), Kamala Russell (researcher), Hector Zapana Almanza (consultant), Hannah Sande (researcher)
    • Language: Aymara
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Berkeley, CA
    • Description: Wh-questions (NR); distant vs. recent past (ZO); verbal morphology in imperatives (KR); relative clauses (HS)
    • Collection: Berkeley Field Methods: Aymara
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Class elicitation session, 2014-10.032, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.7297/X2QN64RD
    • Item number: 2014-10.050
    • Date: 18 Nov 2014
    • Contributors: Nicholas Rolle (researcher), Alfonso Otaegui (researcher), Zachary O'Hagan (researcher), Eva Schinzel (researcher), Hector Zapana Almanza (consultant)
    • Language: Aymara
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Berkeley, CA
    • Description: Cislocative (AO); person-marking (ES); interrogatives (NR); person-marking (ZO)
    • Collection: Berkeley Field Methods: Aymara
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Class elicitation session, 2014-10.050, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.7297/X2NS0RW4