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    • Collection number: 2018-33
    • Primary contributors: María Luisa Garcerán Álvarez (consultant), José Ramírez Ríos (consultant), Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), Teresa Ramírez Saldaña (consultant), María Miranda Llergo (consultant), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant), Pascual Gómez Flores (consultant)
    • Languages: Yaminawa (yaa), Yora (mts)
    • Dates: 2013-
    • Historical information: Yaminawa is an endangered Panoan language of Peruvian Amazonia. Yaminawa (also spelled Yaminahua) forms part of a large dialect complex that includes Nahua (Yora), Sharanahua, Yawanawa, Shanenawa (Arara), and other varieties. Speakers of these languages are distributed across dozens of communities in an area of over 50,000 square miles. There are around 2500 total speakers of the languages that constitute the dialect complex.
      The documentation in this collection comes from fieldwork in Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru with both Yaminawa (Río Sepahua dialect) and Nahua (Yora) speakers. The Río Sepahua variety of Yaminawa and Nahua are highly mutually intelligible and speakers report that the two ethnolinguistic groups lived in a loosely-organized cluster of villages with positive social relationships and a shared language and culture until the Rubber Boom around the turn of the 20th century. At this point, the communities became separated as they fled territorial invasions and violent attacks by rubber workers and other resource extractors. They lost all contact with each other. Around the 1940s, the Yaminawa, who at the time inhabited the headwaters of the Sepahua and Las Piedras rivers, report that they began to enter indirect contact with non-indigenous society through trade with the neighboring Amahuaca. In the 1960s, the Yaminawa were the victims of a genocidal massacre intended to force them into contact to prevent their interference with the lumber extraction industry. Some survivors moved north to the Purús river where they lived among Sharanahua communities, while others became integrated into the Amahuaca community at the Dominican mission in Sepahua. In the 1970s and 80s, several families that had moved to the Purús returned to Sepahua to work in the lumber industry. Up until the mid-1980s, the Nahua continued to live entirely uncontacted in the headwaters of the Mishahua and Manú rivers. In 1984, the Nahua entered contact via run-ins with loggers and Shell Oil workers. The Nahua subsequently suffered a series of devastating epidemics that killed around half of the population. During the epidemics many Yaminawa went to the Mishahua river to aid the Nahua. Though the two communities are politically distinct, they are connected by many close family and social ties resulting from adoptions and marriages between the two communities.
    • Scope and content: Audio recordings of traditional stories in Yaminawa and Yora (Nahua) from a wide variety of genres, including cosmological narratives and animal tales. Accompanied by time-aligned transcriptions and translations in .etf format.
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: María Luisa Garcerán Álvarez, Pascual Gómez Flores, María Miranda Llergo, José Ramírez Ríos, María Ramírez Ríos, Teresa Ramírez Saldaña, and Kelsey Neely. Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project, SCL 2018-33, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.7297/X2P84933

1 - 25 of 50 results

    • Item number: 2018-33.001
    • Date: 15 Jul 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Ramírez Ríos narrates the story of Kapa ñũshĩwu, the Squirrel spirit, who performs a number of amazing feats including draining a river completely, bringing to life a brother-in-law made from natural materials, and clearing and planting a huge field of maize. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Kapa ñũshĩwu/Alma de ardilla/The Squirrel Spirit, 2018-33.001, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/25926
    • Item number: 2018-33.002
    • Date: 30 Jun 2018
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Ramírez Ríos narrates the story of Isku ñũshĩwu ruapitsiwe, the Crested Oropendola (Psarocolius decumanus) spirit and the cannibal. In this story, a young woman takes her new husband to visit her father, who is a cannibal. Her father kills and eats her husband, and she flees back to her in-laws. She then marries her late husband's younger brother, and an identical fate befalls him. She then marries the youngest brother, who has the spirit of a Crested Oropendola. Her third husband uses wit and deception to avenge his brothers' deaths by killing his evil father-in-law. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Isku ñũshĩwu ruapitsiwe/Alma de paucar y el caníbal/The Crested Oropendola Spirit and the Cannibal, 2018-33.002, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26492
    • Item number: 2018-33.003
    • Date: 26 Aug 2017
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Ramírez Ríos narrates the story of Aya ñũshĩwu, the Black-Capped Parakeet spirit. A black-capped parakeet transforms herself into a woman when a man asks her to become his wife. She is able to chew large quantities of corn very quickly to make chicha (maize beer) that is exceptionally sweet. She refuses to drink her own chicha until her husband insists that she do so. When she becomes drunk, she transforms back into a parakeet and flies away. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Aya ñũshĩwu/Alma de perico de gorro negro/The Black-Capped Parakeet Spirit, 2018-33.003, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/25966
    • Item number: 2018-33.004
    • Date: 13 Aug 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Ramírez Ríos narrates the story of Rũnũwã ñũshĩwu, the Anaconda spirit. When a man sees a tapir have sex with a beautiful woman in a lake, he becomes determined to have sex with her, too. When he tricks her into emerging from the lake, he attempts to grab her hair, which is actually the end of the anaconda's tail. She wraps herself around him and drags him underwater to meet her father and brothers. When the man drinks ayahuasca (a hallucinogenic brew) with his new affines, he sees them for what they truly are: anacondas. An armored catfish helps him escape and return to the human world. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Rũnũwã ñũshĩwu/Alma de boa grande/The Anaconda Spirit, 2018-33.004, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/25967
    • Item number: 2018-33.005
    • Date: 30 Jun 2018
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Ramírez Ríos narrates the cosmological narrative of Yuashi, a greedy man who had fire and domesticated plants, but refused to share these with anyone. The story takes place in the Shedipawu 'ancestor' times, when humans and animals spoke a common language and lived together as one community. The narrative includes four distinct episodes: the theft of fire, the theft of maize, the theft of hot peppers, and the ultimate killing of Yuashi. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Yuashi/El miserable/The Greedy One, 2018-33.005, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26490
    • Item number: 2018-33.006
    • Date: 02 Aug 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Ramírez Ríos narrates the story of Xuya ñũshĩwu, the Rat spirit, who teaches a woman how to give birth. A first-time mother is struggling in labor and sends her husband to fetch the traditional surgeon (pũtẽbis). While he is gone, the woman hears the cries of a litter of baby mice, and wonders aloud why she cannot give birth so easily as the rat. The Rat spirit becomes human, and swiftly coaches the woman through labor. By the time her husband arrives with the surgeon, she has already given birth, angering the surgeon, who storms off. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Xuya ñũshĩwu/Alma de ratón/The Rat Spirit, 2018-33.006, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26491
    • Item number: 2018-33.007
    • Date: 30 Jun 2018
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Ramírez Ríos narrates the story of Xũnũwã ñũshĩwu, the spirit(s) of the giant kapok (Ceiba pentandra) tree. In this story, a couple moves into an abandoned house occupied by spirits that constantly steal their food. The couple finally gets revenge, killing Epumãnĩ, the leader of the spirits. The other spirits scatter and hide in a giant kapok tree, which the couple burns down. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Xũnũwã ñũshĩwu/Tunchi de la tremenda lupuna/Spirit of the Giant Kapok Tree, 2018-33.007, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26493
    • Item number: 2018-33.008
    • Date: 30 Jun 2018
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Ramírez Ríos narrates a story about Diiwu ñũshĩ, evil forest spirits. A group of hunters does not heed the warnings of a man who claims to have seen evil forest spirits. Instead of going home, they seek out the spirits, thinking that they must be spider monkeys, and realize the truth too late. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Diiwu ñũshĩ/Tunchi de monte/Evil Forest Spirits, 2018-33.008, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26494
    • Item number: 2018-33.009
    • Date: 19 Aug 2017
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Ramírez Ríos narrates the story of Pãmã weru kechu chaiya Ĩnãwã Xadukĩã (Pãmã who has long eyelids is Grandmother Jaguar). In this story, a man who has too many mouths to feed takes two of his children into the forest to lose them. The children end up coming across the home of Pãmã, AKA Grandmother Jaguar, who traps them and tries to feed them to fatten them up. Two of Grandmother Jaguar's helpers help the children escape and find their way home. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Pãmã weru kechu chaiya Ĩnãwã Xadukĩã/Pãmã que tiene párpados largos es Abuelita Tigre/Pãmã Who Has Long Eyelids Is Grandmother Jaguar, 2018-33.009, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26495
    • Item number: 2018-33.010
    • Date: 15 Aug 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Ramírez Ríos narrates the story of Xukuxukuika ñũshĩwu, the Boat-billed Heron (Cochlearius cochlearius) spirit, who teaches a man to hunt tapir. The man previously erroneously believed tapir to be human, but the Boat-billed Heron spirit corrects him and teaches him the proper diet and behavior prohibitions for hunting. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Xukuxukuika Ñũshĩwu/Alma de tuquituqui/The Boat-billed Heron Spirit, 2018-33.010, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26496
    • Item number: 2018-33.011
    • Date: 15 Aug 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Ramírez Ríos narrates the story of Wuipapi, who is a little man-like forest being. A group of ancestors are walking through the forest when they find him. Everyone treats him with respect, except the last man in the group, who insults Wuipapi. Wuipapi hops onto the man's leg and holds on tight; it is impossible to remove him, and the man is unable to work or walk normally. After some time, the man's wife scares Wuipapi away by brandishing a crab in his face. The man, and all his human descendants, are left with the lower part of the leg thinner than the calf. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Wuipapi/El hombrecillo/The Little Man, 2018-33.011, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26497
    • Item number: 2018-33.012
    • Date: 15 Aug 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Ramírez Ríos narrates the story of Pũĩ Wake, the Feces Child, which explains why humans defecate. A group of ancestors were walking through the forest and found the Feces Child. Everyone treated him with respect, except the last man to pass by. The Feces Child leapt up into the man's rectum, and died and putrefied there, causing foul-smelling gas. Eventually his bones were expelled as feces. Ever since, the man and all his descendants have suffered the curse of flatulence and defecation. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Pũĩ Wake/Hijo de caca/The Feces Child, 2018-33.012, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26498
    • Item number: 2018-33.013
    • Date: 13 Aug 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Ramírez Ríos narrates the story of Iwi Tũkũ Puiki Raweya, the Gnarled Tree with Two Butts. This tree is known for going around killing people, until a village uses wit and deception to tie him up and kill him. The story does not explain why he has two butts. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Iwi Tũkũ Puiki Raweya/Palo nudo que tiene dos potos/The Gnarled Tree with Two Butts, 2018-33.013, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26499
    • Item number: 2018-33.014
    • Date: 13 Aug 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Ramírez Ríos narrates the story of Bapu ñũshĩwu, a clay spirit. After a man's mother makes a large number of clay pots, he implores the most beautiful one to transform herself into a human and become his wife. They live together happily despite the fact that she cannot bathe or wash her hands, lest she melt. The marriage ends when she melts in a rainstorm while her husband neglects her because he is busy fishing. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Bapu ñũshĩwu/Alma de greda/The Clay Spirit, 2018-33.014, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26500
    • Item number: 2018-33.015
    • Date: 20 Jul 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Ramírez Ríos narrates the story of Isku ñũshĩwu, the Crested Oropendola (Psarocolius decumanus) spirit. A man raises a Crested Oropendola, but it eventually flies away as an adult. The man later finds a nest of oropendola chicks and climbs a very, very tall tree to collect them. His rival comes along and cuts down his ladder, causing him to be trapped in the tree. After calling for help all day, a female oropendola comes out of the nest and helps him -- putting medicine in his eyes so he can see the nest as if it were a human home. It turns out the nest belongs to the chick that he raised, and they send him home safely with two chicks, peccary meat, and a very spicy chili pepper. The man uses the chili pepper to get revenge on his rival. The rival eats the pepper, but can't find any water to cool the heat, so he transforms into a Giant Anteater, lapping at ants to quench his thirst. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Isku ñũshĩwu/Alma de paucar/The Crested Oropendola Spirit, 2018-33.015, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26501
    • Item number: 2018-33.016
    • Date: 17 Jul 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Ramírez Ríos narrates the story of Ishpawãwẽ Xukadi, a very elderly man whose skin was peeled off by the Ishpa (mysterious beings), restoring him to his youth. The elderly man had been abandoned by his wife and lived alone with his daughters who cared for him, but after his restoration, he finds where his wife is living and makes her jealous by doing feats of hard agricultural work that attract the attention of many women. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Ishpawãwẽ Xukadi/Él que los ishpa pelaron/The One Who Was Peeled by the Ishpa, 2018-33.016, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26502
    • Item number: 2018-33.017
    • Date: 28 Dec 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Awa ñũshĩwãwẽ ãwĩwu widi, the Tapir spirit who started a relationship with a woman. The woman already had two children from a previous relationship, and she begins to neglect them after getting together with the tapir. Eventually her human lover comes, cleans up her children, and kills the tapir. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Awa ñũshĩwãwẽ ãwĩwu widi/Alma de sachavaca se ha reunido con una mujer/A Tapir Spirit Gets Together with a Woman, 2018-33.017, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26503
    • Item number: 2018-33.018
    • Date: 28 Dec 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Awa xawewe, Tapir and Tortoise. Tapir rapes Tortoise, and when his large penis exits through her mouth, she uses her sharp beak to bite it off. Tapir dies as a result, and Tortoise gathers her kin to feast on his remains. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Awa xawewe/Sachavaca y motelo/Tapir and Tortoise, 2018-33.018, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26504
    • Item number: 2018-33.019
    • Date: 28 Dec 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Uxe, the moon. A man repeatedly comes to sexually abuse a woman in the night, until she smears genipap dye on his face to discover his identity. She curses him, and he is beheaded by another tribe. His decapitated head continues to live. His classificatory brother intends to return the head to their village, but he gets scared and runs off. The head comes rolling after him, following him all the way home. At home, the women refuse to let the head inside, so he asks for thread and hoists himself into the sky. He becomes the moon, then sings a song, cursing women with menstruation. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Uxe/Luna/Moon, 2018-33.019, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26505
    • Item number: 2018-33.020
    • Date: 28 Dec 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Wãrĩ wake tushadi, when the sun popped a baby. In the ancient times, the sun was much closer to the earth and people cooked by putting their food in the sun. One day a woman was sunning her baby, but the sun was too strong and caused her baby to explode. In anger, the woman grabbed the lid of a pot and smacked the sun, sending it flying far away to its current location. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Wãrĩ wake tushadi/El sol reventó a un bebé/The Sun Popped a Baby, 2018-33.020, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26506
    • Item number: 2018-33.021
    • Date: 03 Jan 2014
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Adu ñũshĩwu, the Lowland Paca (Cuniculus paca) spirit. A man kills a paca and brings it home to his wife to eat. The following day he goes fishing with his eldest son, leaving his wife and younger children at home. A paca spirit takes the form of a woman and comes to their home. The human woman offers the spirit some paca meat, and she gets insulted, insisting that she cannot eat her husband. When the woman asks the spirit to pick her lice, the spirit bites her neck, breaking it. The man and his son return to find the paca spirit has killed the entire family. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Adu ñũshĩwu/Alma de majás/The Lowland Paca Spirit, 2018-33.021, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26507
    • Item number: 2018-33.022
    • Date: 03 Jan 2014
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Ĩsũ wake widi, where a spider monkey abducts a child. Years later the father finds his son, but it turns out that his son does not wish to return home permanently, as he has his own wife and family among the monkeys. He teaches his father how to put medicine in his eyes so he can see the monkeys' tree as a human village when he visits. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Ĩsũ wake widi/Maquisapa ha llevado a un niño/A Spider Monkey Abducted a Child, 2018-33.022, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26508
    • Item number: 2018-33.023
    • Date: 03 Jan 2014
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Kashta ñũshĩwu, the Aramdillo spirit. A group of warriors are going to make war when they hear voices in the forest. They find a woman living alone, boiling armadillos in a house full of armadillo shells. When she tells them she is an armadillo spirit, they kill her and leave. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Kashta ñũshĩwu/Alma de carachupa/The Armadillo Spirit, 2018-33.023, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26509
    • Item number: 2018-33.024
    • Date: 06 Jan 2014
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Chai Kushi Wewadi, a man who is able to go very far in the forest and quickly return. On one of his forest journeys, he comes across his long-lost sister who had been abducted as a child by monkeys. He returns home and tells his family. They decide to travel together to reclaim her, and Chai Kushi Wewadi is continually frustrated by how slow they advance. They eventually reach their sister, whose skin sags because the monkeys have stretched it, and rescue her. On the way home, Chai Kushi Wewadi goes ahead, and the group stops to rest. While they are bathing, the monkeys come back and steal their sister again. She is never seen again. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Chai Kushi Wewadi/El primo veloz/The Fast Cousin, 2018-33.024, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26510
    • Item number: 2018-33.025
    • Date: 06 Jan 2014
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Tãrãwã Weruya, about a log that has eyes. While gathering frogs, a man goes too close to a giant fallen log. When he climbs on top of it to get more frogs, the log opens its eye and says "tãrãwã weruya" (log with an eye) to him, then slides into the water and across the river to the opposite bank, with the man still on top. The man swims back to the bank where his village is and never goes near the log again. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Tãrãwã Weruya/Palo que tiene ojo/The Log with an Eye, 2018-33.025, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26511