1 - 6 of 6 results

    • Collection number: 2016-13
    • Relations to this Collection: 2017-03 relates to this Collection
    • Primary contributors: Efrain Escobar (consultant), Margaret Cychosz (researcher), Dmetri Hayes (researcher), Myriam Lapierre (researcher), Raksit Tyler Lau (researcher), Lev Michael (researcher), Julia Eileen Nee (researcher), Emily Remirez (researcher)
    • Language: South Bolivian Quechua (quh)
    • Dates: September 2016 to April 2017
    • Historical information: This Collection represents fieldwork undertaken by students of the Berkeley Field Methods class on South Bolivian Quechua (SBQ) in the 2016-2017 academic year. The course was taught by Professor Lev Michael, and Efrain Escobar (of Cochabamba, Bolivia) was the language consultant. All other contributors listed were students in the class. Elicitation was carried out primarily following methodology described in Matthewson (2004), including translation tasks between SBQ, Spanish, and English, as well as judgments of the grammaticality and semantic felicity of sentences of SBQ in given contexts. Some contexts were provided through oral description in English and Spanish, while others were provided through pictures (including the Topological Relations Picture Series, Bowerman & Pederson 1994) and actions performed by the fieldworker. Elicitation occurred in 30- to 60-minute sessions. More information about the project can be found in Item 2016-13.279 "Collection Guide".
    • Scope and content: Audio recordings of elicitation sessions, as well as accompanying notes. The content includes lexical and grammatical elicitation as well as texts. Some texts are transcribed in ELAN, and ELAN transcriptions are included in the Collection.
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Efrain Escobar, Margaret Cychosz, Dmetri Hayes, Myriam Lapierre, Raksit Tyler Lau, Lev Michael, Julia Eileen Nee, and Emily Remirez. Berkeley Field Methods: South Bolivian Quechua (2016-2017), 2016-13, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.7297/X2T72FMM.
    • Collection number: 2018-35
    • Primary contributors: Nokêrê Kajkwakhrattxi (consultant), Orengô Kajkwakhrattxi (consultant), Jérémie Beauchamp (researcher), Myriam Lapierre (researcher, donor)
    • Additional contributors: Mej Kajkwakhrattxi (consultant), Rowthyktxi Kajkwakhrattxi (consultant), Sakà Kajkwakhrattxi (consultant), Wêtàktxi Kajkwakhrattxi (consultant), Pàjnti Suyà (consultant)
    • Languages: Kajkwakhrattxi, Kĩsêdjê (suy)
    • Dates: 2018-
    • Historical information: Kajkwakhrattxi (also known as Tapayuna) is spoken today by approximately 150 individuals who live in the village of Kawêrêtxikô in the Capoto-Jarina Indigenous Land in the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso. Kawêrêtxikô is the only ethnically Kajkwakhrattxi village, though most Kajkwakhrattxi are not native speakers of the language. Violent contact with the Kajkwakhrattxi by Brazilian farmers occurred in the 1950s and 1960s, when the Kajkwakhrattxi population dropped from between 400 and 1200 individuals to only 41 as a result of intentionally poisoned food gifts. The survivors of the attack were forced out of the land they had been occupying and were relocated into a Kĩsêdjê community in 1971. Although the Kĩsêdjê are a rather closely-related Jê group both in cultural and linguistic terms, the two nations perceive themselves as distinct.
      In 1988, a conflict opposing the two groups forced the Kajkwakhrattxi to seek refuge among the Kayapô, a more distantly related Jê group. This new cohabitation lasted until 2009, when the village of Kawêrêtxikô was founded (Lima 2012). Having lived forty years as a minority, the Kajkwakhrattxi now (as of August 2020) face serious and immediate threats to their culture and language, even though they can now live as an independent nation. The vast majority of the inhabitants of Kawêrêtxikô were born and grew up in a non-Kajkwakhrattxi community, so the language is no longer used for most daily interactions. There are now less than 20 elderly native speakers and no monolingual speakers (Beauchamp 2017). For these reasons, the need to document Kajkwakhrattxi is urgent.
    • Scope and content: Audio recordings of lexical, phonological, grammatical elicitation, and orthography workshop, usually with accompanying scanned original or typed field notes (per session). Includes collaborative research between Beauchamp and Lapierre from a first portion of 2018, followed by individual research by Beauchamp (Lapierre left Kawêrêtxikô on July 27, 2018); Beauchamp had visited Kawêrêtxikô on two prior field trips.
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Nokêrê Kajkwakhrattxi, Orengô Kajkwakhrattxi, Jérémie Beauchamp, and Myriam Lapierre. Kajkwakhrattxi Field Materials, 2018-35, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.7297/X2RF5SH0.
    • Collection number: 2018-34
    • Primary contributor: Myriam Lapierre (researcher, donor)
    • Additional contributors: Awakatu Kayabi (consultant), Emarajup Kayabi (consultant), Itarajup Kayabi (consultant), Jywateju Kayabi (consultant), Kapinua Kayabi (consultant), Kupejani Kayabi (consultant), Makatu Kayabi (consultant), Mu'ni Kayabi (consultant), Pikuruk Kayabi (consultant), Reá Kayabi (consultant), Sirakup Kayabi (consultant), Tarejawat Kayabi (consultant), Tujat Kayabi (consultant), Wyrakatu Kayabi (consultant)
    • Language: Kawaiwete
    • Dates: 2018-
    • Historical information: Kawaiwete is a Tupí-Guaraní language spoken by approximately 1000 people in Mato Grosso, Brazil. The Kawaiwete ethnic group is divided into three indigenous lands: the Xingu, Caiabi, and Apiaká-Kaiabi Indigenous Lands. The Kawaiwete vigorously resisted the invasion of their lands by rubber companies since the end of the 19th century, and many violent conflicts took place with rubber tappers and travelers during the first half of the 20th century. The Kawaiwete’s original land was gradually occupied and the group was forced to work for the rubber companies. When the group was later contacted by the Indian Protection Service, they were offered to move to the Xingu. Most of the Kawaiwete accepted the offer, as it allowed them to escape the rubber tappers, and the group now lives in eleven or so different villages in the Xingu. The process left deep marks and divided the Kawaiwete, many of whom still regret having abandoned their traditional land. The small section of the population that refused to go to the Xingu remains in the Apiaká-Kayabi Indigenous Land. The language is no longer spoken in the Caiabi and Apiaká-Kaiabi Indigenous Lands, and the Kawaiwete who inhabit those areas are now monolingual in Portuguese. The Kawaiwete language is still in daily use by the those who inhabit the Xingu (approximately 70% of the entire entire population), though nearly all of them are fully bilingual in Portuguese (ISA 2017). As such, the situation is close to that of a language shift, and is thus a priority for language documentation.
      Myriam Lapierre's first field trip was in 2018 in the town of Canarana, Mato Grosso, Brazil, where she did lexical elicitation with Pikuruk Kayabi. The second was in 2019, where she first visited the village of Diauarum and then Capivara, both in the Xingu Indigenous Land.
    • Scope and content: Sound recordings of elicitation and texts, field notes.
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Myriam Lapierre. Kawaiwete Field Materials, 2018-34, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.7297/X2Z036NC.
    • Collection number: 2017-12
    • Primary contributors: Saankörä Panära (consultant), Sokkrëë Panära (consultant), Sôpôa Panära (consultant), Myriam Lapierre (researcher, donor)
    • Additional contributors: Kunityk Mëtyktire-Panära (consultant), Kjäräsâ Panära (consultant), Kuka Panära (consultant), Kôkâ Panära (consultant), Kôkôsïrä Panära (consultant), Sokriti Panära (consultant), João Denófrio (participant), Sôpôa Panära (recorder)
    • Languages: Kayapô (txu), Panära (kre)
    • Dates: 2015-
    • Historical information: Panära is spoken today by a community of approximately 630 speakers who live in the demarcated Panará Indigenous Land in the Eastern Amazon. The Panära’s territory consists of 495,000 hectares on the boarder between the states of Pará and Mato Grosso in Central Brazil, and it falls within the municipalities of Guarantã do Norte and Altamira. Until 1973, the Panära inhabited a large area in northern Mato Grosso that stretched from the Cachimbo mountain range to the plains where the city of Colíder is located today. The population numbered up to 600 individuals who were divided among nine villages distributed over the entire territory (Schwartzman 1995). In 1973, the Panära were contacted by Brazilian national society, which resulted in a spread of contagious diseases and a dramatic population loss. By 1976, the 68 Panära survivors had been removed from their native land and resettled in the neighbouring Xingú Park, where they never felt at home (Schwartzman 1984: 232-233). The ancestral land of the Panära was made available for colonization and gold prospecting by the Brazilian government; however, in the late 1980s, the Panära began the process of reclaiming a part of their land that was still intact. With the support of several Brazilian and international non-governmental organizations, their current Indigenous Land was identified in 1994 and officially demarcated in 1998. In 1995, the Panará built a new village, Nänsêpôtiti, near the Iriri River, and in 2012, the population began to spread to four new villages, namely Sönkwê, Sökâräsä, Kôtikô, and Canaã. Today, there are a total of five Panära villages.
      The dramatic population loss that resulted from contact was followed by significant efforts to repopulate, as the Panära became aware that they were nearing extinction. Today, approximately 75% of the population is below the age of 18. In spite of the population loss and still low demography, Panära is a vital language spoken by all members of the community. The Panära are nearly all monolingual in their language, with the exception of the young men, who have varying degrees of proficiency in Brazilian Portuguese as a second language. Children and teenagers’ knowledge of Portuguese is limited to basic vocabulary, and elementary school classes are conducted entirely in Panära by NGO-trained Panära school teachers. As for the handful of Kayapó, Trumai and Kawaiwete speakers who have married into the Panära community, they all have, at the very least, a passive knowledge of Panära.
      The materials in this collection were created by Myriam Lapierre during her field trips to the Terra Indígena Panará with the purpose of collecting data for master's and doctoral research. The field trips occurred in May-June 2015, June-July 2016, June-August 2017, August-September 2018, and July 2019.
      Fieldwork in 2015 was funded by a Travel Fund from the Faculty of Arts of the University of Ottawa and by a Globalink Research Award from the Mitacs program of the Government of Canada. Fieldwork in 2016 was funded by a Joseph Armand Bombardier Scholarship of the Canada Graduate Scholarships-Master’s Program awarded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC), and by a Michael Smith Foreign Study Supplement awarded by SSHRC. Fieldwork in 2017-2019 was funded by a SSHRC Doctoral Fellowship, a Regents Fellowship for Graduate Study awarded by the Graduate Division of the University of California, Berkeley, as well as by an Oswalt Endangered Language Grant awarded by the Survey of California and Other Indian Languages at the University of California, Berkeley.
    • Scope and content: Recordings of elicitation and texts, transcriptions, field notes, and related documents, from the villages of Nänsêpôtiti, Sönkwê, and Sökâräsä.
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Saankörä Panära, Sokkrëë Panära, Sôpôa Panära, and Myriam Lapierre. Panära Field Materials, 2017-12, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.7297/X20R9MWN.
    • Collection number: 2019-34
    • Primary contributors: Sidanere Xavante (consultant), Utebrewê Xavante (consultant), Vinícius Xavante (consultant), Nicholas Carrick (researcher, donor), Teela Huff (researcher, donor), Myriam Lapierre (researcher, donor)
    • Additional contributors: Gonzalo Wamarito (consultant), Silvestre Xavante (consultant)
    • Language: Xavante (xav)
    • Dates: 2019-
    • Historical information: Xavante (also known as A’uwẽ) has approximately 22,000 speakers in multiple indigenous territories, including Marechal Rondom, Maraiwatsede, São Marcos, Pimentel Barbosa, Areões and Sangradouro/Volta Grande, within the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso (Graham, 2020). Bilingualism within these Xavante communities varies widely; some speech communities remain largely monolingual, while other communities have speakers fluent in both Xavante and Brazillian Portuguese. With growing demarcation of indigenous lands, contact from non-indigenous Brazillians is higher than ever before, and there is an ever-increasing number of bilingual Xavante-Portuguese speakers within these speech communities.
      At the beginning of the 18th century, due to the discovery of gold in the state of Goiás, a large number of non-indigenous communities began to occupy Xavante indigeous lands in search of this valuable mineral. The violent encroachment of non-indigenous people on Xavante lands forced the relocation of indigneous groups in the area. A subset of the Xavante ancestors crossed to the west bank of the Araguaia River, while others remained on the east bank, creating a geographic division that resulted in the two Central Jê languages: Xavante and Xerente. The materials in this collection were recorded in the Xavante village of Êtenhiritipá, located approximately two hours from Canarana, the nearest Brazilian Portuguese speaking town. This close proximity to non-indigenous peoples has increased the language shift within this community, as younger speakers are now often bilingual in Xavante and Portuguese.
      Graham, L. (2020, June 26). Xavante. Retrieved October 15, 2020, from https://pib.socioambiental.org/pt/Povo:Xavante.
    • Scope and content: Sound recordings and field notes.
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Sidanere Xavante, Utebrewê Xavante, Vinícius Xavante, Nicholas Carrick, Teela Huff, and Myriam Lapierre. Xavante Field Materials, 2019-34, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.7297/X24Q7SGG.

1 - 25 of 126 results

    • Item number: 2018-27.002
    • Date: 22 Mar 2019
    • Contributors: Amalia Horan Skilton (speaker, researcher), Nicolas Arms (participant), Bernat Bardagil Mas (participant), Emily Clem (participant), Virginia Dawson (participant), Stephanie Farmer (participant), William Hanks (participant), Larry M. Hyman (participant), Peter Jenks (participant), Myriam Lapierre (participant), Lev Michael (participant), Line Mikkelsen (participant), Kelsey Neely (participant), Zachary O'Hagan (participant; ORCID)
    • Language: Ticuna (tca)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Berkeley, CA
    • Description: PhD candidate: Skilton; PhD dissertation committee: Michael (chair), Mikkelsen, Hanks (external member). Other individuals labeled as participants asked questions. The first .wav file includes the research presentation followed by questions from Michael and Mikkelsen; the second .wav file includes questions from Hanks and the audience. One .pdf file consists of slides of the research presentation; the other .pdf file, and the .mov file, are referenced in the presentation. To display correctly, the video clip must be opened in VLC Media Player together with the subtitles file.
    • Collection: Berkeley Linguistics PhD Defenses
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Amalia Skilton: Spatial and Non-spatial Deixis in Cushillococha Ticuna, 2018-27.002, in "Berkeley Linguistics PhD Defenses", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26632.
    • Item number: 2019-34.001
    • Date: 24 Jun 2019 to 25 Jun 2019
    • Relations to this item: 2019-34.002 is referenced by this Item
    • Contributors: Gonzalo Wamarito (consultant), Silvestre Xavante (consultant), Vinícius Xavante (consultant), Nicholas Carrick (researcher, donor), Teela Huff (researcher, donor), Myriam Lapierre (researcher, donor)
    • Language: Xavante (xav)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Ẽtênhiritipá, Pimentel Barbosa, Mato Grosso, Brazil
    • Description: The following list summarizes the corresponding page numbers in the field notes of each of the three researchers.
      xav_vinicius_20190624_mjl-nac-trh_1_elicit: MJL 1; NAC 31-34; TRH 34-37
      xav_vinicius_20190624_mjl-nac-trh_2_elicit: MJL 2; NAC 34-37; TRH 37-39
      xav_vinicius_20190624_mjl-nac-trh_3_elicit: MJL 3-4; NAC 38-42; TRH 40-45
      xav_vinicius_20190624_mjl-nac-trh_4_elicit: MJL 5-6; NAC 43-46; TRH 46-47
      xav_vinicius_20190625_mjl-nac-trh_5_elicit: MJL 7-8; NAC 47-51; TRH 48-53
      xav_vinicius_20190625_mjl-nac-trh_6_elicit: MJL 9-10; NAC 52-57; TRH 54-58
      xav_vinicius_20190625_mjl-nac-trh_7_elicit: MJL 11-12; NAC 60-63; TRH 59-61
      xav_vinicius_20190625_mjl-nac-trh_8_elicit: MJL 13-15; NAC 64-68; TRH 62-65
    • Collection: Xavante Field Materials
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Audio recordings of lexical elicitation, 2019-34.001, in "Xavante Field Materials", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.7297/X20Z71SK.
    • Item number: 2016-13.156
    • Date: 26 Jan 2017
    • Relations to this item: 2016-13.214 relates to this Item
    • Contributors: Efrain Escobar (consultant), Myriam Lapierre (researcher)
    • Language: South Bolivian Quechua (quh)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Berkeley, CA
    • Description: The first WAV recording associated with this file bundle includes: (a) two-minute story in Quechua by EES about visiting the beach and washing clothes (b) transcription of the story in (a). The recording labelled "quh_ees_20170126_mjl_1_story.wav" contains a cut out of "quh_ees_20170126_mjl_1_elicit.wav," which is the story in (a).
    • Collection: Berkeley Field Methods: South Bolivian Quechua (2016-2017)
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Beach story with transcription, 2016-13.156, in "Berkeley Field Methods: South Bolivian Quechua (2016-2017)", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/24133.
    • Item number: 2016-13.040
    • Date: 23 Sep 2016
    • Contributors: Efrain Escobar (consultant), Myriam Lapierre (researcher)
    • Language: South Bolivian Quechua (quh)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Berkeley, CA
    • Collection: Berkeley Field Methods: South Bolivian Quechua (2016-2017)
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Elicitation on accusative pronoun paradigm, clusivity distinction, 2016-13.040, in "Berkeley Field Methods: South Bolivian Quechua (2016-2017)", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/23825.
    • Item number: 2016-13.062
    • Date: 07 Oct 2016
    • Contributors: Efrain Escobar (consultant), Myriam Lapierre (researcher)
    • Language: South Bolivian Quechua (quh)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Berkeley, CA
    • Collection: Berkeley Field Methods: South Bolivian Quechua (2016-2017)
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Elicitation on intransitive sentences, accusative pronouns, 2016-13.062, in "Berkeley Field Methods: South Bolivian Quechua (2016-2017)", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/23876.
    • Item number: 2016-13.014
    • Date: 09 Sep 2016
    • Contributors: Efrain Escobar (consultant), Myriam Lapierre (researcher)
    • Language: South Bolivian Quechua (quh)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Berkeley, CA
    • Collection: Berkeley Field Methods: South Bolivian Quechua (2016-2017)
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Elicitation on lexicon, alignment, constituent ordering, 2016-13.014, in "Berkeley Field Methods: South Bolivian Quechua (2016-2017)", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/23797.