Wappo

The traditional Wappo language area is in Alexander Valley, most of Napa Valley, and northern Sonoma Valley. In the 21st century, there are no first-language speakers (Golla 2011). However, tribal members and language activists have been pursuing language revitalization and reclamation.

Wappo is a Yukian language; the other member of this family is Northern Yukian.

Selected archival materials at Berkeley

Selected materials in other archives

Further reading

  • Driver, Harold E. 1936. Wappo Ethnography. Berkeley: University of California Press. [PDF]
  • Golla, Victor. 2011. California Indian languages. Berkeley: University of California Press.
  • Radin, Paul. 1924. Wappo texts (first series). University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology 19:1-148. [PDF]
  • Radin, Paul. 1929. A grammar of the Wappo language. University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology 27:1-194. [PDF]
  • Sawyer, Jesse O. 1965. English-Wappo vocabulary. Berkeley: University of California Press.
  • Sawyer, Jesse O. 1991. Wappo Studies Berkeley: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, Report 7. [PDF]
  • Schlichter, Alice. 1985. The Yukian language family. Ph.D. dissertation, University of California, Berkeley. [PDF]
  • Thompson, Sandra A., Joseph Sung-Yul Park, and Charles N. Li. 2006. A reference grammar of Wappo. Berkeley: University of California Press. [PDF]

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