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    • Collection number: 2013-02
    • Primary contributors: Lev Michael (donor), Christine Beier (donor), Stephanie Farmer (donor, data_inputter), Greg Finley (donor), Kelsey Neely (donor), Amalia Horan Skilton (donor, data_inputter), Grace Neveu (donor), John Sylak (donor), Elizabeth Goodrich (donor)
    • Additional contributors: Federico López Algoba (speaker, research_participant), Segundo Ríos Tapullima (participant), Robertina Tamayo Tapullima (speaker, research_participant), Alberto Mosoline Mogica (research_participant, speaker, participant), Elbio Mogica Ríos (research_participant, speaker), Michael Gilmore (speaker), Lev Michael (data_inputter, transcriber, author, researcher, recorder, speaker), Amelia Mosoline Mogica (consultant, speaker), Soraida López Algoba (research_participant, consultant, speaker), Rosario Ríos Ríos (research_participant, speaker), Lindaura Pinedo Ríos (research_participant, speaker, participant), Emerson Ríos Tapullima (research_participant, speaker), Gilberto Perez Navarro (research_participant, speaker), Romero Ríos Ochoa (research_participant, speaker), Teodora Tamayo Tapullima (author, speaker, research_participant, participant), Liberato Mosoline Mogica (author, speaker, research_participant, participant), Christine Beier (data_inputter, compiler, author, photographer, researcher, recorder, transcriber), Juan Marcos Mercier (author), Marco Ríos Pinedo (research_participant, speaker), Lizardo Gonzáles Flores (research_participant, speaker, author, participant), Stephanie Farmer (collector, compiler, author, photographer, recorder, researcher, participant, transcriber), Everest Ríos Vaca (participant), Marcos Tamayo Tapullima (speaker, research_participant), Severino Ríos Ochoa (research_participant, speaker), Rusber Tangoa Ríos (author, speaker, research_participant, interpreter, participant), John Sylak-Glassman (data_inputter), Luciano Tapullima Navarro (speaker, research_participant), Trujillo Ríos Díaz (speaker, research_participant), Kelsey Neely (photographer, author, researcher, recorder, transcriber), Greg Finley (participant, recorder, data_inputter, transcriber, developer, author, researcher), Amalia Horan Skilton (photographer, author, responder, recorder, transcriber, researcher), Neyda Mosoline Mogica (speaker, research_participant), Samuel Ríos Flores (research_participant, speaker), Marcelina Mogica Pacaya (research_participant, speaker), Elena Mogica Ríos (research_participant, speaker), Pedro López Algoba (speaker, research_participant), Grace Neveu (researcher, author, transcriber), Selmira Tamayo Tapullima (research_participant, speaker), Jesusa Mosoline Mogica (speaker, research_participant), Victoria Mozombite Ríos (research_participant, speaker), Adriano Ríos Sánchez (research_participant, speaker, consultant), Grapulio Mogica Ríos (participant), Sebastián Ríos Ochoa (research_participant, speaker, participant), Elizabeth Goodrich (author), John Sylak (transcriber, author, researcher, recorder), Enrique Ríos Díaz (speaker, research_participant), Hermelinda Mosoline Ríos (signer, speaker, research_participant), Julián Ríos Mogica (speaker, research_participant), Nancy Ríos Ochoa (research_participant, speaker), Blanca Mozombite Tapullima (research_participant, speaker), Otilia López Gordillo (speaker, research_participant)
    • Languages: Máíhĩ̵̀kì (ore), Secoya (sey)
    • Dates: 2009-2015
    • Historical information: Máíhĩ̵̀kì is a highly endangered Western Tukanoan language spoken (in 2015) by around 80 individuals primarily along the Yanayacu, Sucusari, Algodón, and Putumayo rivers in northern Peru.
      The data archived herein were collected beginning in 2006 on a fieldtrip by Christine Beier and Lev Michael to the Máíhùnà community of Sucusari. In 2009, Beier (adjunct faculty member in the UC Berkeley Department of Linguistics since 2016) and Michael (faculty member in the UC Berkeley Department of Linguistics since 2008) returned to lay the foundation for the Máíhĩ̵̀kì Project, which from 2010 through 2015 has involved the collaborative research efforts of Beier, Michael, and UC Berkeley linguistics graduate students Stephanie Farmer, Greg Finley, Kelsey Neely, Amalia Skilton (initially affiliated with Yale University), and John Sylak-Glassman, and UC Berkeley undergraduates Elizabeth Goodrich and Grace Neveu. The Máíhĩ̵̀kì Project was funded by National Science Foundation grant BCS-1065621 (PI Michael).
      Materials in this collection include those collected in solo fieldwork by Stephanie Farmer in the winter (January and February) of 2013 and the summer (July and August) of 2014, with funding from the Robert L. Oswalt Graduate Student Support Endowment for Endangered Language Documentation. Other materials in this collection were gathered by Amalia Skilton between June 2013 and June 2014 with funding from a Parker Huang Undergraduate Travel Fellowship from Yale University, and subsequently in May and June 2015.
      The Máíhĩ̵̀kì Project was carried out primarily in the community of Nueva Vida, located on the Yanayacu River. Exceptions include brief trips to the communities of Puerto Huamán, Sucusari, and San Pablo de Totolla for annual meetings of FECONAMAI (the Máíhùnà indigenous federation), and prolonged fieldtrips by Amalia Skilton to the communities of Sucusari and San Antonio del Estrecho. Sucusari is located on the Sucusari River and San Antonio del Estrecho is the major administrative center for the Peruvian portion of the Putumayo River basin.
      Stephanie Farmer was responsible, with the consultation of Lev Michael, Christine Beier, and Amalia Skilton, for prearchiving of this collection (including materials collected through September 2014) between 2013 and 2015. Amalia Skilton was responsible for the prearchiving, in September 2015, of materials collected in May and June 2015.
    • Scope and content: This collection includes primary materials (e.g., audio and video recordings), derived products (e.g., transcriptions and translations), and linguistic analyses of Máíhĩ̵̀kì produced by the Máíhĩ̵̀kì Project, which was launched in June 2010, and is currently ongoing (as of September 2015). File bundle 2013-02.141 contains an index that indicates the file bundle location of each media file and each of its associated annotation files as of September 13, 2015.
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Christine Beier, Stephanie Farmer, Greg Finley, Elizabeth Goodrich, Lev Michael, Kelsey Neely, Grace Neveu, Amalia Horan Skilton, and John Sylak. Materials of the Berkeley Máíhĩ̵̀kì Project, SCL 2013-02, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.7297/X2DR2SGD
    • Associated materials: Field notebook of John Sylak-Glassman (Sylak-Glassman.001) from 2011 is archived separately with the California Language Archive.
    • Collection number: 2018-33
    • Primary contributors: María Luisa Garcerán Álvarez (consultant), José Ramírez Ríos (consultant), Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), Teresa Ramírez Saldaña (consultant), María Miranda Llergo (consultant), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant), Pascual Gómez Flores (consultant)
    • Languages: Yaminawa (yaa), Yora (mts)
    • Dates: 2013-
    • Historical information: Yaminawa is an endangered Panoan language of Peruvian Amazonia. Yaminawa (also spelled Yaminahua) forms part of a large dialect complex that includes Nahua (Yora), Sharanahua, Yawanawa, Shanenawa (Arara), and other varieties. Speakers of these languages are distributed across dozens of communities in an area of over 50,000 square miles. There are around 2500 total speakers of the languages that constitute the dialect complex.
      The documentation in this collection comes from fieldwork in Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru with both Yaminawa (Río Sepahua dialect) and Nahua (Yora) speakers. The Río Sepahua variety of Yaminawa and Nahua are highly mutually intelligible and speakers report that the two ethnolinguistic groups lived in a loosely-organized cluster of villages with positive social relationships and a shared language and culture until the Rubber Boom around the turn of the 20th century. At this point, the communities became separated as they fled territorial invasions and violent attacks by rubber workers and other resource extractors. They lost all contact with each other. Around the 1940s, the Yaminawa, who at the time inhabited the headwaters of the Sepahua and Las Piedras rivers, report that they began to enter indirect contact with non-indigenous society through trade with the neighboring Amahuaca. In the 1960s, the Yaminawa were the victims of a genocidal massacre intended to force them into contact to prevent their interference with the lumber extraction industry. Some survivors moved north to the Purús river where they lived among Sharanahua communities, while others became integrated into the Amahuaca community at the Dominican mission in Sepahua. In the 1970s and 80s, several families that had moved to the Purús returned to Sepahua to work in the lumber industry. Up until the mid-1980s, the Nahua continued to live entirely uncontacted in the headwaters of the Mishahua and Manú rivers. In 1984, the Nahua entered contact via run-ins with loggers and Shell Oil workers. The Nahua subsequently suffered a series of devastating epidemics that killed around half of the population. During the epidemics many Yaminawa went to the Mishahua river to aid the Nahua. Though the two communities are politically distinct, they are connected by many close family and social ties resulting from adoptions and marriages between the two communities.
    • Scope and content: Audio recordings of traditional stories in Yaminawa and Yora (Nahua) from a wide variety of genres, including cosmological narratives and animal tales
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: María Luisa Garcerán Álvarez, Pascual Gómez Flores, María Miranda Llergo, José Ramírez Ríos, María Ramírez Ríos, Teresa Ramírez Saldaña, and Kelsey Neely. Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project, SCL 2018-33, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.7297/X2P84933

1 - 25 of 55 results

    • Item number: 2018-33.021
    • Date: 03 Jan 2014
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Adu ñũshĩwu, the Lowland Paca (Cuniculus paca) spirit. A man kills a paca and brings it home to his wife to eat. The following day he goes fishing with his eldest son, leaving his wife and younger children at home. A paca spirit takes the form of a woman and comes to their home. The human woman offers the spirit some paca meat, and she gets insulted, insisting that she cannot eat her husband. When the woman asks the spirit to pick her lice, the spirit bites her neck, breaking it. The man and his son return to find the paca spirit has killed the entire family. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: María Miranda Llergo and Kelsey Neely. Adu ñũshĩwu/Alma de majás/The Lowland Paca Spirit, 2018-33.021, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26507
    • Item number: 2018-33.017
    • Date: 28 Dec 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Awa ñũshĩwãwẽ ãwĩwu widi, the Tapir spirit who started a relationship with a woman. The woman already had two children from a previous relationship, and she begins to neglect them after getting together with the tapir. Eventually her human lover comes, cleans up her children, and kills the tapir. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: María Miranda Llergo and Kelsey Neely. Awa ñũshĩwãwẽ ãwĩwu widi/Alma de sachavaca se ha reunido con una mujer/A Tapir Spirit Gets Together with a Woman, 2018-33.017, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26503
    • Item number: 2018-33.018
    • Date: 28 Dec 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Awa xawewe, Tapir and Tortoise. Tapir rapes Tortoise, and when his large penis exits through her mouth, she uses her sharp beak to bite it off. Tapir dies as a result, and Tortoise gathers her kin to feast on his remains. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: María Miranda Llergo and Kelsey Neely. Awa xawewe/Sachavaca y motelo/Tapir and Tortoise, 2018-33.018, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26504
    • Item number: 2018-33.003
    • Date: 26 Aug 2017
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file. María Ramírez Ríos narrates the story of Aya ñũshĩwu, the Black-Capped Parakeet spirit. A black-capped parakeet transforms herself into a woman when a man asks her to become his wife. She is able to chew large quantities of corn very quickly to make chicha (maize beer) that is exceptionally sweet. She refuses to drink her own chicha until her husband insists that she do so. When she becomes drunk, she transforms back into a parakeet and flies away. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Kelsey Neely and María Ramírez Ríos. Aya ñũshĩwu/Alma de perico de gorro negro/The Black-Capped Parakeet Spirit, 2018-33.003, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/25966
    • Item number: 2018-33.014
    • Date: 13 Aug 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file. María Ramírez Ríos narrates the story of Bapu ñũshĩwu, a clay spirit. After a man's mother makes a large number of clay pots, he implores the most beautiful one to transform herself into a human and become his wife. They live together happily despite the fact that she cannot bathe or wash her hands, lest she melt. The marriage ends when she melts in a rainstorm while her husband neglects her because he is busy fishing. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Kelsey Neely and María Ramírez Ríos. Bapu ñũshĩwu/Alma de greda/The Clay Spirit, 2018-33.014, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26500
    • Item number: 2018-33.033
    • Date: 07 May 2015
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Bataxta ñũshĩwu, a frog spirit. In this story, a man asks a frog to become human so he can take her as his wife. She does, but when she refuses to have sex with him, he rapes her. It turns out that her vagina has teeth, which cut off his penis and he bleeds out. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: María Miranda Llergo and Kelsey Neely. Bataxta ñũshĩwu/Alma de rana/The Frog Spirit, 2018-33.033, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26519
    • Item number: 2018-33.044
    • Date: 24 May 2015
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), Teresa Ramírez Saldaña (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file. Teresa Ramírez Saldaña narrates the story of Bawis ñũshĩwu, the sitaraco ant (Eciton spp.) spirit. In this story, two ant men fight over an ant woman. When one of the ant men beats the ant woman, all of the other ant women come to defend her. Ultimately one of the ant men kills the other. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Kelsey Neely and Teresa Ramírez Saldaña. Bawis ñũshĩwu/Alma de hormiga sitaraco/The Sitaraco Ant Spirit, 2018-33.044, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26533
    • Item number: 2018-33.024
    • Date: 06 Jan 2014
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Chai Kushi Wewadi, a man who is able to go very far in the forest and quickly return. On one of his forest journeys, he comes across his long-lost sister who had been abducted as a child by monkeys. He returns home and tells his family. They decide to travel together to reclaim her, and Chai Kushi Wewadi is continually frustrated by how slow they advance. They eventually reach their sister, whose skin sags because the monkeys have stretched it, and rescue her. On the way home, Chai Kushi Wewadi goes ahead, and the group stops to rest. While they are bathing, the monkeys come back and steal their sister again. She is never seen again. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: María Miranda Llergo and Kelsey Neely. Chai Kushi Wewadi/El primo veloz/The Fast Cousin, 2018-33.024, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26510
    • Item number: 2018-33.008
    • Date: 30 Jun 2018
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file. María Ramírez Ríos narrates a story about Diiwu ñũshĩ, evil forest spirits. A group of hunters does not heed the warnings of a man who claims to have seen evil forest spirits. Instead of going home, they seek out the spirits, thinking that they must be spider monkeys, and realize the truth too late. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Kelsey Neely and María Ramírez Ríos. Diiwu ñũshĩ/Tunchi de monte/Evil Forest Spirits, 2018-33.008, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26494
    • Item number: 2018-33.027
    • Date: 16 Jul 2014
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Dukuwede ãwĩwuwe uxawãpaudi, about a man who repeatedly comes to sleep with a woman, but always sneaks away in the morning. The woman becomes frustrated that the man never stays to have breakfast with her family or go hunting with her father, so she traps the young man one morning by holding on tightly to him in the hammock. She shames him publicly and tells him not to come back unless he plans on staying. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: María Miranda Llergo and Kelsey Neely. Dukuwede ãwĩwuwe uxawãpaudi/Un hombre venía a dormir con una mujer/A Man Came to Sleep with a Woman, 2018-33.027, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26513
    • Item number: 2018-33.037
    • Date: 28 May 2015
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Ede mẽrã ñũshĩwu, river-dwelling spirits similar to river dolphins or mermaids. A merman named Bushuidu repeatedly comes to abduct the children of a village when they play in the river, until one day a man shoots him in the face with a two-pronged arrow (creating a blow-hole like opening on his head). This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: María Miranda Llergo and Kelsey Neely. Ede mẽrã ñũshĩwu/Sirena/Mermaid, 2018-33.037, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26523
    • Item number: 2018-33.016
    • Date: 17 Jul 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file. María Ramírez Ríos narrates the story of Ishpawãwẽ Xukadi, a very elderly man whose skin was peeled off by the Ishpa (mysterious beings), restoring him to his youth. The elderly man had been abandoned by his wife and lived alone with his daughters who cared for him, but after his restoration, he finds where his wife is living and makes her jealous by doing feats of hard agricultural work that attract the attention of many women. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Kelsey Neely and María Ramírez Ríos. Ishpawãwẽ Xukadi/Él que los ishpa pelaron/The One Who Was Peeled by the Ishpa, 2018-33.016, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26502
    • Item number: 2018-33.002
    • Date: 30 Jun 2018
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file. María Ramírez Ríos narrates the story of Isku ñũshĩwu ruapitsiwe, the Crested Oropendola (Psarocolius decumanus) spirit and the cannibal. In this story, a young woman takes her new husband to visit her father, who is a cannibal. Her father kills and eats her husband, and she flees back to her in-laws. She then marries her late husband's younger brother, and an identical fate befalls him. She then marries the youngest brother, who has the spirit of a Crested Oropendola. Her third husband uses wit and deception to avenge his brothers' deaths by killing his evil father-in-law. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Kelsey Neely and María Ramírez Ríos. Isku ñũshĩwu ruapitsiwe/Alma de paucar y el caníbal/The Crested Oropendola Spirit and the Cannibal, 2018-33.002, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26492
    • Item number: 2018-33.015
    • Date: 20 Jul 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file. María Ramírez Ríos narrates the story of Isku ñũshĩwu, the Crested Oropendola (Psarocolius decumanus) spirit. A man raises a Crested Oropendola, but it eventually flies away as an adult. The man later finds a nest of oropendola chicks and climbs a very, very tall tree to collect them. His rival comes along and cuts down his ladder, causing him to be trapped in the tree. After calling for help all day, a female oropendola comes out of the nest and helps him -- putting medicine in his eyes so he can see the nest as if it were a human home. It turns out the nest belongs to the chick that he raised, and they send him home safely with two chicks, peccary meat, and a very spicy chili pepper. The man uses the chili pepper to get revenge on his rival. The rival eats the pepper, but can't find any water to cool the heat, so he transforms into a Giant Anteater, lapping at ants to quench his thirst. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Kelsey Neely and María Ramírez Ríos. Isku ñũshĩwu/Alma de paucar/The Crested Oropendola Spirit, 2018-33.015, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26501
    • Item number: 2018-33.038
    • Date: 28 May 2015
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Isu, about a man who thinks tĩkũ birds are spider monkeys. His family eats only the birds, until his brother-in-law comes to visit and teaches him to hunt spider monkeys. At first the man refuses to eat spider monkey because he believes it is a forest spirit that will kill him, but he finally gives it a try and ends up enjoying it greatly. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: María Miranda Llergo and Kelsey Neely. Isu/Maquisapa/Spider Monkey, 2018-33.038, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26524
    • Item number: 2018-33.013
    • Date: 13 Aug 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file. María Ramírez Ríos narrates the story of Iwi Tũkũ Puiki Raweya, the Gnarled Tree with Two Butts. This tree is known for going around killing people, until a village uses wit and deception to tie him up and kill him. The story does not explain why he has two butts. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Kelsey Neely and María Ramírez Ríos. Iwi Tũkũ Puiki Raweya/Palo nudo que tiene dos potos/The Gnarled Tree with Two Butts, 2018-33.013, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26499
    • Item number: 2018-33.043
    • Date: 30 Jul 2014
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), Teresa Ramírez Saldaña (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file. Teresa Ramírez Saldaña narrates the story of Ĩnãwã Xadu, Grandmother Jaguar. The story begins with a woman who is married to a giant earthworm. Her mother comes to visit and kills the worm while she is cleaning. The woman becomes distressed over the death of her husband and runs into the forest calling for Grandmother Jaguar to come and eat her alive. Grandmother Jaguar's two sons hear her and decide to take her as their wife. Before they can have sex, she has to abort her pregnancy by the worm, which consists of all the creeping, crawling creatures in the world. She then becomes pregnant by the two brothers, and the baby is born. One day, the men go to the forest and the woman goes to collect fish, leaving the baby with Grandmother Jaguar. When the woman returns, she sees that Grandmother Jaguar has cooked the baby in a pot of chicha. When the two men hear their wife screaming they come back and try to kill Grandmother Jaguar, but her body is too hard. They build a huge fire and burn her, with her body cracking apart as pieces of stone that shoot off in every direction. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Kelsey Neely and Teresa Ramírez Saldaña. Ĩnãwã Xadu/Abuelita tigre/Grandmother Jaguar, 2018-33.043, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26531
    • Item number: 2018-33.022
    • Date: 03 Jan 2014
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Ĩsũ wake widi, where a spider monkey abducts a child. Years later the father finds his son, but it turns out that his son does not wish to return home permanently, as he has his own wife and family among the monkeys. He teaches his father how to put medicine in his eyes so he can see the monkeys' tree as a human village when he visits. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: María Miranda Llergo and Kelsey Neely. Ĩsũ wake widi/Maquisapa ha llevado a un niño/A Spider Monkey Abducted a Child, 2018-33.022, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26508
    • Item number: 2018-33.001
    • Date: 15 Jul 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file. María Ramírez Ríos narrates the story of Kapa ñũshĩwu, the Squirrel spirit, who performs a number of amazing feats including draining a river completely, bringing to life a brother-in-law made from natural materials, and clearing and planting a huge field of maize. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Kelsey Neely and María Ramírez Ríos. Kapa ñũshĩwu/Alma de ardilla/The Squirrel Spirit, 2018-33.001, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/25926
    • Item number: 2018-33.023
    • Date: 03 Jan 2014
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Kashta ñũshĩwu, the Aramdillo spirit. A group of warriors are going to make war when they hear voices in the forest. They find a woman living alone, boiling armadillos in a house full of armadillo shells. When she tells them she is an armadillo spirit, they kill her and leave. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: María Miranda Llergo and Kelsey Neely. Kashta ñũshĩwu/Alma de carachupa/The Armadillo Spirit, 2018-33.023, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26509
    • Item number: 2018-33.039
    • Date: 18 Aug 2013
    • Contributors: María Luisa Garcerán Álvarez (consultant), Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file. María Luísa Garcerán Álvarez narrates the story of Mãshãrũnẽ xawewu puyexkedi, about the time that the Jaguar twisted the Tortoises' arms. The Tortoises are playing on a swing in the forest when a Jaguar comes and wants to play. They trick him and push him into a spiky huicungo palm (Astrocaryum huicungo). He dies and they feast on his body. Later, Jaguar's brother comes along and, seeing his brother's footprints, suspects the Tortoises of killing him. He cuts off their feet and twists their arms, explaining why tortoises look the way they do. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: María Luisa Garcerán Álvarez and Kelsey Neely. Mãshãrũnẽ xawewu puyexkedi/Tigre ha torcido los brazos a los motelos/Jaguar Twists the Tortoises' Arms, 2018-33.039, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26525
    • Item number: 2018-33.028
    • Date: 16 Jul 2014
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story Nãĩ ñũshĩwu, about two Southern Tamandua (Tamandua tetradactyla) spirits that marry a human man. They constantly scratch him up all over his body and tear his hammock with their long claws. When he visits his mother, he does not tell her the identity of his wives, and she wonders why he always comes home scratched up. Eventually one of his male relatives follows him to his home, and kills the two tamandua spirit women. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: María Miranda Llergo and Kelsey Neely. Nãĩ ñũshĩwu/Alma de shishi/The Tamandua Spirit, 2018-33.028, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26514
    • Item number: 2018-33.045
    • Date: 05 May 2015
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), Teresa Ramírez Saldaña (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file. Teresa Ramírez Saldaña narrates the story of Ñũshĩ Xerewu, long-armed, long-legged forest demons. A husband and wife are in the forest gathering when the demons attack. They run away, and when the woman gets tired and begins to slow down, her husband keeps running and abandons her. She takes off her skirt and brandishes it at the demons to keep them at bay. Then her dogs arrive and chase the demons, killing and eating them. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Kelsey Neely and Teresa Ramírez Saldaña. Ñũshĩ Xerewu/Diablos de monte/Forest Demons, 2018-33.045, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26534
    • Item number: 2018-33.034
    • Date: 07 May 2015
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Nũwẽ Shidi Charu Wai Shidi, an ancient witchdoctor named Ancient Path of Flowers. One day while he is having visions, two spirits come dump water on him as a practical joke. He gets revenge by chasing them with his shaman's smoke through the spirit realm as they attempt to escape him by changing form. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: María Miranda Llergo and Kelsey Neely. Ñũwẽ Shidi Charu Wai Shidi/Brujo antiguo que se llama Camino Antiguo de Flores/The Ancient Witchdoctor Named Ancient Path of Flowers, 2018-33.034, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26520