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    • Collection number: Kaufman
    • Primary contributor: Terrence Kaufman (researcher)
    • Additional contributor: Javier Lopez Cartas (consultant)
    • Languages: Zapotec, Zapotecan, Chinook Jargon, Mayan, Huastecan, Tzeltal
    • Dates: 1960s-1990s and undated
    • Extent: 11 items
    • Historical information: Terrence Kaufman is a professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Pittsburgh in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He received a Ph.D. in linguistics from the University of California, Berkeley in 1963. His doctoral dissertation was a grammar of Tzeltal. He has published widely on a variety of topics related to linguistic anthropology, and has contributed to the documentation and description of languages in the Mayan, Siouan, UtoAztecan, and OtoManguean families.
    • Scope and content: The Papers consist of materials related to Kaufman's research on the languages of Mesoamerica, especially unpublished or pre-publication drafts of articles and class handouts. The collection also includes mimeographs of Chinook Jargon materials.
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Terrence Kaufman Papers on Indigenous Languages of Mesoamerica, SCL Kaufman, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/collection/20
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One result

    • Item number: Kaufman.001
    • Date: 1986 March
    • Contributor: Terrence Kaufman (researcher)
    • Language: Mayan
    • Availability: In person by appointment
    • Extent: 1 folder
    • Description: Photocopy of typed manuscript.
    • Collection: Terrence Kaufman Papers on Indigenous Languages of Mesoamerica
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Some structural characteristics of Mayan languages with especial referece to Quiche, Kaufman.001, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/1336

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