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    • Collection number: 2018-33
    • Primary contributors: María Luisa Garcerán Álvarez (consultant), José Ramírez Ríos (consultant), Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), Teresa Ramírez Saldaña (consultant), María Miranda Llergo (consultant), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant), Pascual Gómez Flores (consultant)
    • Languages: Yaminawa (yaa), Yora (mts)
    • Dates: 2013-
    • Historical information: Yaminawa is an endangered Panoan language of Peruvian Amazonia. Yaminawa (also spelled Yaminahua) forms part of a large dialect complex that includes Nahua (Yora), Sharanahua, Yawanawa, Shanenawa (Arara), and other varieties. Speakers of these languages are distributed across dozens of communities in an area of over 50,000 square miles. There are around 2500 total speakers of the languages that constitute the dialect complex.
      The documentation in this collection comes from fieldwork in Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru with both Yaminawa (Río Sepahua dialect) and Nahua (Yora) speakers. The Río Sepahua variety of Yaminawa and Nahua are highly mutually intelligible and speakers report that the two ethnolinguistic groups lived in a loosely-organized cluster of villages with positive social relationships and a shared language and culture until the Rubber Boom around the turn of the 20th century. At this point, the communities became separated as they fled territorial invasions and violent attacks by rubber workers and other resource extractors. They lost all contact with each other. Around the 1940s, the Yaminawa, who at the time inhabited the headwaters of the Sepahua and Las Piedras rivers, report that they began to enter indirect contact with non-indigenous society through trade with the neighboring Amahuaca. In the 1960s, the Yaminawa were the victims of a genocidal massacre intended to force them into contact to prevent their interference with the lumber extraction industry. Some survivors moved north to the Purús river where they lived among Sharanahua communities, while others became integrated into the Amahuaca community at the Dominican mission in Sepahua. In the 1970s and 80s, several families that had moved to the Purús returned to Sepahua to work in the lumber industry. Up until the mid-1980s, the Nahua continued to live entirely uncontacted in the headwaters of the Mishahua and Manú rivers. In 1984, the Nahua entered contact via run-ins with loggers and Shell Oil workers. The Nahua subsequently suffered a series of devastating epidemics that killed around half of the population. During the epidemics many Yaminawa went to the Mishahua river to aid the Nahua. Though the two communities are politically distinct, they are connected by many close family and social ties resulting from adoptions and marriages between the two communities.
    • Scope and content: Audio recordings of traditional stories in Yaminawa and Yora (Nahua) from a wide variety of genres, including cosmological narratives and animal tales. Accompanied by time-aligned transcriptions and translations in .etf format.
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: María Luisa Garcerán Álvarez, Pascual Gómez Flores, María Miranda Llergo, José Ramírez Ríos, María Ramírez Ríos, Teresa Ramírez Saldaña, and Kelsey Neely. Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project, SCL 2018-33, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.7297/X2P84933

1 - 22 of 22 results

    • Item number: 2018-33.021
    • Date: 03 Jan 2014
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Adu ñũshĩwu, the Lowland Paca (Cuniculus paca) spirit. A man kills a paca and brings it home to his wife to eat. The following day he goes fishing with his eldest son, leaving his wife and younger children at home. A paca spirit takes the form of a woman and comes to their home. The human woman offers the spirit some paca meat, and she gets insulted, insisting that she cannot eat her husband. When the woman asks the spirit to pick her lice, the spirit bites her neck, breaking it. The man and his son return to find the paca spirit has killed the entire family. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Adu ñũshĩwu/Alma de majás/The Lowland Paca Spirit, 2018-33.021, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26507
    • Item number: 2018-33.017
    • Date: 28 Dec 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Awa ñũshĩwãwẽ ãwĩwu widi, the Tapir spirit who started a relationship with a woman. The woman already had two children from a previous relationship, and she begins to neglect them after getting together with the tapir. Eventually her human lover comes, cleans up her children, and kills the tapir. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Awa ñũshĩwãwẽ ãwĩwu widi/Alma de sachavaca se ha reunido con una mujer/A Tapir Spirit Gets Together with a Woman, 2018-33.017, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26503
    • Item number: 2018-33.018
    • Date: 28 Dec 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Awa xawewe, Tapir and Tortoise. Tapir rapes Tortoise, and when his large penis exits through her mouth, she uses her sharp beak to bite it off. Tapir dies as a result, and Tortoise gathers her kin to feast on his remains. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Awa xawewe/Sachavaca y motelo/Tapir and Tortoise, 2018-33.018, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26504
    • Item number: 2018-33.033
    • Date: 07 May 2015
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Bataxta ñũshĩwu, a frog spirit. In this story, a man asks a frog to become human so he can take her as his wife. She does, but when she refuses to have sex with him, he rapes her. It turns out that her vagina has teeth, which cut off his penis and he bleeds out. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Bataxta ñũshĩwu/Alma de rana/The Frog Spirit, 2018-33.033, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26519
    • Item number: 2018-33.024
    • Date: 06 Jan 2014
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Chai Kushi Wewadi, a man who is able to go very far in the forest and quickly return. On one of his forest journeys, he comes across his long-lost sister who had been abducted as a child by monkeys. He returns home and tells his family. They decide to travel together to reclaim her, and Chai Kushi Wewadi is continually frustrated by how slow they advance. They eventually reach their sister, whose skin sags because the monkeys have stretched it, and rescue her. On the way home, Chai Kushi Wewadi goes ahead, and the group stops to rest. While they are bathing, the monkeys come back and steal their sister again. She is never seen again. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Chai Kushi Wewadi/El primo veloz/The Fast Cousin, 2018-33.024, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26510
    • Item number: 2018-33.027
    • Date: 16 Jul 2014
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Dukuwede ãwĩwuwe uxawãpaudi, about a man who repeatedly comes to sleep with a woman, but always sneaks away in the morning. The woman becomes frustrated that the man never stays to have breakfast with her family or go hunting with her father, so she traps the young man one morning by holding on tightly to him in the hammock. She shames him publicly and tells him not to come back unless he plans on staying. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Dukuwede ãwĩwuwe uxawãpaudi/Un hombre venía a dormir con una mujer/A Man Came to Sleep with a Woman, 2018-33.027, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26513
    • Item number: 2018-33.037
    • Date: 28 May 2015
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Ede mẽrã ñũshĩwu, river-dwelling spirits similar to river dolphins or mermaids. A merman named Bushuidu repeatedly comes to abduct the children of a village when they play in the river, until one day a man shoots him in the face with a two-pronged arrow (creating a blow-hole like opening on his head). This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Ede mẽrã ñũshĩwu/Sirena/Mermaid, 2018-33.037, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26523
    • Item number: 2018-33.038
    • Date: 28 May 2015
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Isu, about a man who thinks tĩkũ birds are spider monkeys. His family eats only the birds, until his brother-in-law comes to visit and teaches him to hunt spider monkeys. At first the man refuses to eat spider monkey because he believes it is a forest spirit that will kill him, but he finally gives it a try and ends up enjoying it greatly. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Isu/Maquisapa/Spider Monkey, 2018-33.038, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26524
    • Item number: 2018-33.022
    • Date: 03 Jan 2014
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Ĩsũ wake widi, where a spider monkey abducts a child. Years later the father finds his son, but it turns out that his son does not wish to return home permanently, as he has his own wife and family among the monkeys. He teaches his father how to put medicine in his eyes so he can see the monkeys' tree as a human village when he visits. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Ĩsũ wake widi/Maquisapa ha llevado a un niño/A Spider Monkey Abducted a Child, 2018-33.022, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26508
    • Item number: 2018-33.023
    • Date: 03 Jan 2014
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Kashta ñũshĩwu, the Aramdillo spirit. A group of warriors are going to make war when they hear voices in the forest. They find a woman living alone, boiling armadillos in a house full of armadillo shells. When she tells them she is an armadillo spirit, they kill her and leave. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Kashta ñũshĩwu/Alma de carachupa/The Armadillo Spirit, 2018-33.023, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26509
    • Item number: 2018-33.028
    • Date: 16 Jul 2014
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story Nãĩ ñũshĩwu, about two Southern Tamandua (Tamandua tetradactyla) spirits that marry a human man. They constantly scratch him up all over his body and tear his hammock with their long claws. When he visits his mother, he does not tell her the identity of his wives, and she wonders why he always comes home scratched up. Eventually one of his male relatives follows him to his home, and kills the two tamandua spirit women. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Nãĩ ñũshĩwu/Alma de shishi/The Tamandua Spirit, 2018-33.028, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26514
    • Item number: 2018-33.034
    • Date: 07 May 2015
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Nũwẽ Shidi Charu Wai Shidi, an ancient witchdoctor named Ancient Path of Flowers. One day while he is having visions, two spirits come dump water on him as a practical joke. He gets revenge by chasing them with his shaman's smoke through the spirit realm as they attempt to escape him by changing form. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Ñũwẽ Shidi Charu Wai Shidi/Brujo antiguo que se llama Camino Antiguo de Flores/The Ancient Witchdoctor Named Ancient Path of Flowers, 2018-33.034, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26520
    • Item number: 2018-33.031
    • Date: 21 Jul 2014
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Ruawu Dawawu, the Bad People. In this story, a group of Bad People come and massacre a village and burn it to the ground. Some of the children are playing in the forest and survive. They imitate the subsistence activities that they observed their parents doing in order to survive. One older couple also survived the attack and has been living among the Bad People. The man goes hunting where his village once stood, and finds the children, who are now young adults. He makes a plan with them, and they wait a generation until the survivors constitute a village, then get revenge on the Bad People. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Ruawu Dawawu/Los malos/The Bad People, 2018-33.031, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26517
    • Item number: 2018-33.025
    • Date: 06 Jan 2014
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Tãrãwã Weruya, about a log that has eyes. While gathering frogs, a man goes too close to a giant fallen log. When he climbs on top of it to get more frogs, the log opens its eye and says "tãrãwã weruya" (log with an eye) to him, then slides into the water and across the river to the opposite bank, with the man still on top. The man swims back to the bank where his village is and never goes near the log again. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Tãrãwã Weruya/Palo que tiene ojo/The Log with an Eye, 2018-33.025, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26511
    • Item number: 2018-33.032
    • Date: 21 Jul 2014
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Tĩĩkã, a man who gets women to have sex with him by offering them good firewood. He climbs a tree in the forest, then tosses down the wood, and when the women hear it, they come running to collect it. One day his tump line slips while he is climbing and he dies by hanging. The men realize where their wives have been getting wood. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Tĩĩkã, 2018-33.032, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26518
    • Item number: 2018-33.035
    • Date: 07 May 2015
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Tua ñũshĩwu, the Bullfrog spirit. An older man goes to cut trees, and in his absence his younger wife goes off on a peccary hunting trip with two younger men, so she can have sex with them. The older man returns to an empty home and goes back out into the forest looking for his wife. It gets late and he has to sleep in the forest, hugging a fallen tree for warmth. All night long the bullfrog spirit harasses him by singing loudly so he cannot sleep. He goes home without having found his wife, who comes home the next day with her two lovers and baskets full of peccary meat. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Tua ñũshĩwu/Alma de rana/The Bullfrog Spirit, 2018-33.035, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26521
    • Item number: 2018-33.019
    • Date: 28 Dec 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Uxe, the moon. A man repeatedly comes to sexually abuse a woman in the night, until she smears genipap dye on his face to discover his identity. She curses him, and he is beheaded by another tribe. His decapitated head continues to live. His classificatory brother intends to return the head to their village, but he gets scared and runs off. The head comes rolling after him, following him all the way home. At home, the women refuse to let the head inside, so he asks for thread and hoists himself into the sky. He becomes the moon, then sings a song, cursing women with menstruation. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Uxe/Luna/Moon, 2018-33.019, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26505
    • Item number: 2018-33.020
    • Date: 28 Dec 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Wãrĩ wake tushadi, when the sun popped a baby. In the ancient times, the sun was much closer to the earth and people cooked by putting their food in the sun. One day a woman was sunning her baby, but the sun was too strong and caused her baby to explode. In anger, the woman grabbed the lid of a pot and smacked the sun, sending it flying far away to its current location. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Wãrĩ wake tushadi/El sol reventó a un bebé/The Sun Popped a Baby, 2018-33.020, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26506
    • Item number: 2018-33.026
    • Date: 06 Jan 2014
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Wedeuba, about a widow who has a single young daughter. After her husband dies, she gets together with a new partner, and frequently leaves her young daughter unattended while she goes off into the forest with him. One day, unbeknownst to her, her daughter follows her into the forest looking for her, but gets caught in a rainstorm and dies of exposure. When a search party finally finds the body, the villagers shame the mother causing the death of her daughter due to neglect. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Wedeuba/La viuda/The widow, 2018-33.026, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26512
    • Item number: 2018-33.030
    • Date: 05 Aug 2014
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Wupa ñũshĩwu, the South American Palm Weevil (Rhynchophorus palmarum) spirit. A single woman is gathering food in the forest when she hears a palm weevil buzz by and implores it to become a human man and live as her husband. The palm weevil spirit turns into a short, bald, pitch black man, and accompanies her home. Unfortunately, he doesn't hunt or fish -- he only gathers palm weevil grubs, which are actually his lice. When the young woman gets angry and publicly insults him for only feeding her family grubs, he becomes ashamed, transforms back into a weevil, and flies away. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Wupa ñũshĩwu/Alma de papazo/The Palm Weevil Spirit, 2018-33.030, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26516
    • Item number: 2018-33.029
    • Date: 16 Jul 2014
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Xeki ñũshĩwu, the maize spirits. In the evenings, a field of maize starts to sing and dance. A man hears them in the night and discovers them the next morning laid down on the ground after a night of partying. He tells the others in his village and they feast on the ripe corn. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Xeki ñũshĩwu/Las almas de maíz/The Maize Spirits, 2018-33.029, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26515
    • Item number: 2018-33.036
    • Date: 07 May 2015
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Miranda Llergo (consultant)
    • Language: Yora (mts)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Miranda Llergo narrates the story of Yura ñũwẽ dai mẽrã kadi, about a shaman who goes to heaven. After his wife and older daughters die, the old shaman is left with only his youngest daughter and her children. He eats tobacco to go into a trance to travel to the afterlife, where he visits his older daughters. Upon his return, the younger daughter demands that he bring back pijuayo palm (Bactris gasipaes) fruits for her to plant. He warns her that eating the fruit will cause her to die, but she repeats her demand until he relents. After she eats the fruit, she ages quickly and dies. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Yura ñũwẽ dai mẽrã kadi/Gente brujo se ha ido al cielo/A Shaman Goes to Heaven, 2018-33.036, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26522