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    • Collection number: 2018-33
    • Primary contributors: María Luisa Garcerán Álvarez (consultant), José Ramírez Ríos (consultant), Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), Teresa Ramírez Saldaña (consultant), María Miranda Llergo (consultant), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant), Pascual Gómez Flores (consultant)
    • Languages: Yaminawa (yaa), Yora (mts)
    • Dates: 2013-
    • Historical information: Yaminawa is an endangered Panoan language of Peruvian Amazonia. Yaminawa (also spelled Yaminahua) forms part of a large dialect complex that includes Nahua (Yora), Sharanahua, Yawanawa, Shanenawa (Arara), and other varieties. Speakers of these languages are distributed across dozens of communities in an area of over 50,000 square miles. There are around 2500 total speakers of the languages that constitute the dialect complex.
      The documentation in this collection comes from fieldwork in Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru with both Yaminawa (Río Sepahua dialect) and Nahua (Yora) speakers. The Río Sepahua variety of Yaminawa and Nahua are highly mutually intelligible and speakers report that the two ethnolinguistic groups lived in a loosely-organized cluster of villages with positive social relationships and a shared language and culture until the Rubber Boom around the turn of the 20th century. At this point, the communities became separated as they fled territorial invasions and violent attacks by rubber workers and other resource extractors. They lost all contact with each other. Around the 1940s, the Yaminawa, who at the time inhabited the headwaters of the Sepahua and Las Piedras rivers, report that they began to enter indirect contact with non-indigenous society through trade with the neighboring Amahuaca. In the 1960s, the Yaminawa were the victims of a genocidal massacre intended to force them into contact to prevent their interference with the lumber extraction industry. Some survivors moved north to the Purús river where they lived among Sharanahua communities, while others became integrated into the Amahuaca community at the Dominican mission in Sepahua. In the 1970s and 80s, several families that had moved to the Purús returned to Sepahua to work in the lumber industry. Up until the mid-1980s, the Nahua continued to live entirely uncontacted in the headwaters of the Mishahua and Manú rivers. In 1984, the Nahua entered contact via run-ins with loggers and Shell Oil workers. The Nahua subsequently suffered a series of devastating epidemics that killed around half of the population. During the epidemics many Yaminawa went to the Mishahua river to aid the Nahua. Though the two communities are politically distinct, they are connected by many close family and social ties resulting from adoptions and marriages between the two communities.
    • Scope and content: Audio recordings of traditional stories in Yaminawa and Yora (Nahua) from a wide variety of genres, including cosmological narratives and animal tales. Accompanied by time-aligned transcriptions and translations in .etf format.
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: María Luisa Garcerán Álvarez, Pascual Gómez Flores, María Miranda Llergo, José Ramírez Ríos, María Ramírez Ríos, Teresa Ramírez Saldaña, and Kelsey Neely. Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project, SCL 2018-33, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.7297/X2P84933

1 - 25 of 29 results

    • Item number: 2018-33.003
    • Date: 26 Aug 2017
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Ramírez Ríos narrates the story of Aya ñũshĩwu, the Black-Capped Parakeet spirit. A black-capped parakeet transforms herself into a woman when a man asks her to become his wife. She is able to chew large quantities of corn very quickly to make chicha (maize beer) that is exceptionally sweet. She refuses to drink her own chicha until her husband insists that she do so. When she becomes drunk, she transforms back into a parakeet and flies away. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Aya ñũshĩwu/Alma de perico de gorro negro/The Black-Capped Parakeet Spirit, 2018-33.003, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/25966
    • Item number: 2018-33.014
    • Date: 13 Aug 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Ramírez Ríos narrates the story of Bapu ñũshĩwu, a clay spirit. After a man's mother makes a large number of clay pots, he implores the most beautiful one to transform herself into a human and become his wife. They live together happily despite the fact that she cannot bathe or wash her hands, lest she melt. The marriage ends when she melts in a rainstorm while her husband neglects her because he is busy fishing. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Bapu ñũshĩwu/Alma de greda/The Clay Spirit, 2018-33.014, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26500
    • Item number: 2018-33.044
    • Date: 24 May 2015
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), Teresa Ramírez Saldaña (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. Teresa Ramírez Saldaña narrates the story of Bawis ñũshĩwu, the sitaraco ant (Eciton spp.) spirit. In this story, two ant men fight over an ant woman. When one of the ant men beats the ant woman, all of the other ant women come to defend her. Ultimately one of the ant men kills the other. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Bawis ñũshĩwu/Alma de hormiga sitaraco/The Sitaraco Ant Spirit, 2018-33.044, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26533
    • Item number: 2018-33.008
    • Date: 30 Jun 2018
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Ramírez Ríos narrates a story about Diiwu ñũshĩ, evil forest spirits. A group of hunters does not heed the warnings of a man who claims to have seen evil forest spirits. Instead of going home, they seek out the spirits, thinking that they must be spider monkeys, and realize the truth too late. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Diiwu ñũshĩ/Tunchi de monte/Evil Forest Spirits, 2018-33.008, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26494
    • Item number: 2018-33.016
    • Date: 17 Jul 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Ramírez Ríos narrates the story of Ishpawãwẽ Xukadi, a very elderly man whose skin was peeled off by the Ishpa (mysterious beings), restoring him to his youth. The elderly man had been abandoned by his wife and lived alone with his daughters who cared for him, but after his restoration, he finds where his wife is living and makes her jealous by doing feats of hard agricultural work that attract the attention of many women. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Ishpawãwẽ Xukadi/Él que los ishpa pelaron/The One Who Was Peeled by the Ishpa, 2018-33.016, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26502
    • Item number: 2018-33.002
    • Date: 30 Jun 2018
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Ramírez Ríos narrates the story of Isku ñũshĩwu ruapitsiwe, the Crested Oropendola (Psarocolius decumanus) spirit and the cannibal. In this story, a young woman takes her new husband to visit her father, who is a cannibal. Her father kills and eats her husband, and she flees back to her in-laws. She then marries her late husband's younger brother, and an identical fate befalls him. She then marries the youngest brother, who has the spirit of a Crested Oropendola. Her third husband uses wit and deception to avenge his brothers' deaths by killing his evil father-in-law. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Isku ñũshĩwu ruapitsiwe/Alma de paucar y el caníbal/The Crested Oropendola Spirit and the Cannibal, 2018-33.002, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26492
    • Item number: 2018-33.015
    • Date: 20 Jul 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Ramírez Ríos narrates the story of Isku ñũshĩwu, the Crested Oropendola (Psarocolius decumanus) spirit. A man raises a Crested Oropendola, but it eventually flies away as an adult. The man later finds a nest of oropendola chicks and climbs a very, very tall tree to collect them. His rival comes along and cuts down his ladder, causing him to be trapped in the tree. After calling for help all day, a female oropendola comes out of the nest and helps him -- putting medicine in his eyes so he can see the nest as if it were a human home. It turns out the nest belongs to the chick that he raised, and they send him home safely with two chicks, peccary meat, and a very spicy chili pepper. The man uses the chili pepper to get revenge on his rival. The rival eats the pepper, but can't find any water to cool the heat, so he transforms into a Giant Anteater, lapping at ants to quench his thirst. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Isku ñũshĩwu/Alma de paucar/The Crested Oropendola Spirit, 2018-33.015, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26501
    • Item number: 2018-33.013
    • Date: 13 Aug 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Ramírez Ríos narrates the story of Iwi Tũkũ Puiki Raweya, the Gnarled Tree with Two Butts. This tree is known for going around killing people, until a village uses wit and deception to tie him up and kill him. The story does not explain why he has two butts. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Iwi Tũkũ Puiki Raweya/Palo nudo que tiene dos potos/The Gnarled Tree with Two Butts, 2018-33.013, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26499
    • Item number: 2018-33.043
    • Date: 30 Jul 2014
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), Teresa Ramírez Saldaña (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. Teresa Ramírez Saldaña narrates the story of Ĩnãwã Xadu, Grandmother Jaguar. The story begins with a woman who is married to a giant earthworm. Her mother comes to visit and kills the worm while she is cleaning. The woman becomes distressed over the death of her husband and runs into the forest calling for Grandmother Jaguar to come and eat her alive. Grandmother Jaguar's two sons hear her and decide to take her as their wife. Before they can have sex, she has to abort her pregnancy by the worm, which consists of all the creeping, crawling creatures in the world. She then becomes pregnant by the two brothers, and the baby is born. One day, the men go to the forest and the woman goes to collect fish, leaving the baby with Grandmother Jaguar. When the woman returns, she sees that Grandmother Jaguar has cooked the baby in a pot of chicha. When the two men hear their wife screaming they come back and try to kill Grandmother Jaguar, but her body is too hard. They build a huge fire and burn her, with her body cracking apart as pieces of stone that shoot off in every direction. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Ĩnãwã Xadu/Abuelita tigre/Grandmother Jaguar, 2018-33.043, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26531
    • Item number: 2018-33.001
    • Date: 15 Jul 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Ramírez Ríos narrates the story of Kapa ñũshĩwu, the Squirrel spirit, who performs a number of amazing feats including draining a river completely, bringing to life a brother-in-law made from natural materials, and clearing and planting a huge field of maize. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Kapa ñũshĩwu/Alma de ardilla/The Squirrel Spirit, 2018-33.001, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/25926
    • Item number: 2018-27.001
    • Date: 12 Oct 2018
    • Contributors: Lev Michael (participant), Zachary O'Hagan (participant), Myriam Lapierre (participant), Christine Beier (participant), Stephanie Farmer (participant), Kelsey Neely (speaker), Amalia Horan Skilton (participant), Emily Clem (participant), Eve Sweetser (participant), Kayla Palakurthy (participant), Justin Davidson (participant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Berkeley, CA
    • Description: PhD candidate: Neely; PhD dissertation committee: Michael (chair), Sweetser, Davidson (external member). Other individuals labeled as participants asked questions. There are audio and video files for each of four segments of the defense. (Some pairs of those files are not exactly equivalent, since the audio and video recorders were turned on and shut off at slightly different times.) Files containing 01 correspond to the research presentation, 02-03 to questions from the committee, and 04 to questions from the audience. One .pdf file consists of slides of the research presentation.
    • Collection: Berkeley Linguistics PhD Defenses
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Kelsey Neely: The Linguistic Expression of Affective Stance in Yaminawa (Pano, Peru), 2018-27.001, in "Berkeley Linguistics PhD Defenses", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.7297/X29C6VMT
    • Item number: 2018-33.039
    • Date: 18 Aug 2013
    • Contributors: María Luisa Garcerán Álvarez (consultant), Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Luísa Garcerán Álvarez narrates the story of Mãshãrũnẽ xawewu puyexkedi, about the time that the Jaguar twisted the Tortoises' arms. The Tortoises are playing on a swing in the forest when a Jaguar comes and wants to play. They trick him and push him into a spiky huicungo palm (Astrocaryum huicungo). He dies and they feast on his body. Later, Jaguar's brother comes along and, seeing his brother's footprints, suspects the Tortoises of killing him. He cuts off their feet and twists their arms, explaining why tortoises look the way they do. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Mãshãrũnẽ xawewu puyexkedi/Tigre ha torcido los brazos a los motelos/Jaguar Twists the Tortoises' Arms, 2018-33.039, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26525
    • Item number: 2018-33.045
    • Date: 24 May 2015
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), Teresa Ramírez Saldaña (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. Teresa Ramírez Saldaña narrates the story of Ñũshĩ Xerewu, long-armed, long-legged forest demons. A husband and wife are in the forest gathering when the demons attack. They run away, and when the woman gets tired and begins to slow down, her husband keeps running and abandons her. She takes off her skirt and brandishes it at the demons to keep them at bay. Then her dogs arrive and chase the demons, killing and eating them. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Ñũshĩ Xerewu/Diablos de monte/Forest Demons, 2018-33.045, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26534
    • Item number: 2018-33.009
    • Date: 19 Aug 2017
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Ramírez Ríos narrates the story of Pãmã weru kechu chaiya Ĩnãwã Xadukĩã (Pãmã who has long eyelids is Grandmother Jaguar). In this story, a man who has too many mouths to feed takes two of his children into the forest to lose them. The children end up coming across the home of Pãmã, AKA Grandmother Jaguar, who traps them and tries to feed them to fatten them up. Two of Grandmother Jaguar's helpers help the children escape and find their way home. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Pãmã weru kechu chaiya Ĩnãwã Xadukĩã/Pãmã que tiene párpados largos es Abuelita Tigre/Pãmã Who Has Long Eyelids Is Grandmother Jaguar, 2018-33.009, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26495
    • Item number: 2018-33.012
    • Date: 15 Aug 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Ramírez Ríos narrates the story of Pũĩ Wake, the Feces Child, which explains why humans defecate. A group of ancestors were walking through the forest and found the Feces Child. Everyone treated him with respect, except the last man to pass by. The Feces Child leapt up into the man's rectum, and died and putrefied there, causing foul-smelling gas. Eventually his bones were expelled as feces. Ever since, the man and all his descendants have suffered the curse of flatulence and defecation. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Pũĩ Wake/Hijo de caca/The Feces Child, 2018-33.012, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26498
    • Item number: 2018-33.047
    • Date: 08 Aug 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), José Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. José Ramírez Ríos narrates the story of Pũstũ, a pot-bellied man who was very brave. When a group of menacing forest demons come to his home one night he fights them off. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Pũstũ/El barrigón/The Pot-bellied Man, 2018-33.047, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26536
    • Item number: 2018-33.048
    • Date: 12 Aug 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), Pascual Gómez Flores (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. Pascual Gómez Flores narrates the story of Riwi ñũshĩwu, the Dove spirit. While gathering achiote, a man implores a dove to become human and be his wife. She complies, and they have a child. The dove spirit frequently goes to the river to play with her cousins, but does not bring her husband. One day her husband follows her and she puts medicine in his eyes so he can see the doves as people. They play by whipping saw grass at each other and one of the cousins cuts off the man's head. The dove spirit fixes it and takes him home, but he becomes ill and dies shortly after. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Riwi ñũshĩwu/Alma de paloma/The Dove Spirit, 2018-33.048, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26537
    • Item number: 2018-33.050
    • Date: 26 Jul 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), José Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. José Ramírez Ríos narrates the story of Ruapitsi, a cannibal. The cannibal marries a woman, but eats her. He then takes her sister as a wife, but she discovers her sister's bones one day, and hides from him. When he arrives home, he is hungry, but has nothing to eat. He slices off a small piece of his calf muscle and grills it. He repeats this, and ends up cutting the vein in his leg. His wife runs back in when she hears his cries and kills him with an axe. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Ruapitsi/El caníbal/The Cannibal, 2018-33.050, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26539
    • Item number: 2018-33.004
    • Date: 13 Aug 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Ramírez Ríos narrates the story of Rũnũwã ñũshĩwu, the Anaconda spirit. When a man sees a tapir have sex with a beautiful woman in a lake, he becomes determined to have sex with her, too. When he tricks her into emerging from the lake, he attempts to grab her hair, which is actually the end of the anaconda's tail. She wraps herself around him and drags him underwater to meet her father and brothers. When the man drinks ayahuasca (a hallucinogenic brew) with his new affines, he sees them for what they truly are: anacondas. An armored catfish helps him escape and return to the human world. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Rũnũwã ñũshĩwu/Alma de boa grande/The Anaconda Spirit, 2018-33.004, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/25967
    • Item number: 2018-33.049
    • Date: 12 Aug 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher), Pascual Gómez Flores (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. Pascual Gómez Flores narrates the story Rũpũtũ, about the origin of flies and biting insects. A group of ancestors are walking in the forest when they pass a huge paper nest, vibrating with insects inside. They are all very careful to pass it without disturbing it, until the last man to pass by picks up a stick and busts it open, releasing all of the flies, wasps, mosquitoes, and other troublesome insects into the world. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Rũpũtũ/Mosca/Fly, 2018-33.049, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26538
    • Item number: 2018-33.040
    • Date: 19 Jul 2014
    • Contributors: María Luisa Garcerán Álvarez (consultant), Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Luísa Garcerán Álvarez narrates the story of Shedipawãwẽ kashta ñũshĩwu widi, about an ancestor man who marries an armadillo spirit. The man is hunting an armadillo in the forest when he implores it to become human and be his wife. She does, and they live happily for quite some time, despite the fact that she only eats sweet corn. One day he fails to accommodate her specific diet and she becomes angry with him, turning back into an armadillo, along with their many children. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Shedipawãwẽ kashta ñũshĩwu widi/Gente antiguo se ha reunido con alma de carachupa/An Ancestor Married an Armadillo Spirit, 2018-33.040, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26526
    • Item number: 2018-33.046
    • Date: 17 Jul 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), José Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. José Ramírez Ríos narrates the story of Wari, the sun. This story explains that the sun used to be very close to the earth and that people cooked with its heat alone. Fire was later acquired by a bird who stole an ember. The sun was a woman, and a man wished to have sex with her, until he saw that she had a strange vagina and changed his mind. The sun then went far away from the earth to its current location. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Wari/Sol/Sun, 2018-33.046, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26535
    • Item number: 2018-33.041
    • Date: 05 Aug 2014
    • Contributors: María Luisa Garcerán Álvarez (consultant), Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Luísa Garcerán Álvarez narrates the story of Wedeuba rawe, about two widows who treated each other poorly as young women, but reconcile and offer each other mutual support after they are both widowed. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Wedeuba rawe/Las dos viudas/The two widows, 2018-33.041, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26529
    • Item number: 2018-33.011
    • Date: 15 Aug 2013
    • Contributors: Kelsey Neely (researcher, donor), María Ramírez Ríos (consultant)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Ramírez Ríos narrates the story of Wuipapi, who is a little man-like forest being. A group of ancestors are walking through the forest when they find him. Everyone treats him with respect, except the last man in the group, who insults Wuipapi. Wuipapi hops onto the man's leg and holds on tight; it is impossible to remove him, and the man is unable to work or walk normally. After some time, the man's wife scares Wuipapi away by brandishing a crab in his face. The man, and all his human descendants, are left with the lower part of the leg thinner than the calf. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Wuipapi/El hombrecillo/The Little Man, 2018-33.011, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26497
    • Item number: 2018-33.042
    • Date: 19 Jul 2014
    • Contributors: María Luisa Garcerán Álvarez (consultant), Kelsey Neely (donor, researcher)
    • Language: Yaminawa (yaa)
    • Availability: Online access
    • Place: Sepahua, Ucayali, Peru
    • Description: One .wav file, with accompanying .eaf annotation file. María Luísa Garcerán Álvarez narrates the story of Xete ñũshĩwu, the Black Vulture spirit. After a woman's husband dies, she implores a vulture to take her to heaven to see him. The vulture spirit does so in exchange for sex. However, when the woman arrives in the afterlife, she cannot eat, drink, or even sit down, and her husband sends her home. Soon after she gets sick and dies from having had sex with the vulture spirit. This traditional narrative was volunteered by the speaker and performed extemporaneously.
    • Collection: Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project
    • Repository: Survey of California and Other Indian Languages
    • Preferred citation: Xete ñũshĩwu/Alma de gallinazo/The Vulture Spirit, 2018-33.042, in "Materials of the Yaminawa Language Documentation Project", Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, University of California, Berkeley, http://cla.berkeley.edu/item/26530